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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MINIMIZING AIR & WATER CONTAMINATION FROM AGRICULTURAL PESTICIDES Title: Transfers of iodine in the soil-plant-air system: Solid-liquid partitioning, migration, plant uptake adn volatilization

Author
item Ashworth, Daniel

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 12, 2008
Publication Date: June 2, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/53102000/pdf_pubs/P2214.pdf
Citation: Ashworth, D.J. 2009. Transfers of iodine in the soil-plant-air system: Solid-liquid partitioning, migration, plant uptake adn volatilization. In: V.R. Preedy, G.N. Burrow and R.R. Watson (eds.) Comprehensive Handbook of Iodine. Academic Press, Elsevier, Inc. UK. Chapter 11 pp: 107-118.

Interpretive Summary: Human exposure to soil iodine depends upon the partitioning of the iodine into the, mobile, liquid and gaseous soil phases. From the liquid phase, iodine can be transported into surface- and ground-waters, plant roots, and, consequently, into the human diet. From the gaseous phase, iodine can be transported to the atmosphere where human exposure may occur due to inhalation. The literature suggests that the vast majority of soil iodine is strongly bound by the soil solid phase and so is considered immobile. However, partitioning into the liquid and gaseous phases clearly does occur, primarily under anoxic conditions due to the presence of poorly sorbed iodine species. Under such conditions, iodine leaching, plant uptake (for plants with roots that can withstand anoxic conditions, e.g. rice) and volatile emissions to the atmosphere are likely to be increased. The potential for human exposure to iodine is therefore also increased

Technical Abstract: Human exposure to soil iodine depends upon the partitioning of the iodine into the, mobile, liquid and gaseous soil phases. From the liquid phase, iodine can be transported into surface- and ground-waters, plant roots, and, consequently, into the human diet. From the gaseous phase, iodine can be transported to the atmosphere where human exposure may occur due to inhalation. The literature suggests that the vast majority of soil iodine is strongly bound by the soil solid phase and so is considered immobile. However, partitioning into the liquid and gaseous phases clearly does occur, primarily under anoxic conditions due to the presence of poorly sorbed iodine species. Under such conditions, iodine leaching, plant uptake (for plants with roots that can withstand anoxic conditions, e.g. rice) and volatile emissions to the atmosphere are likely to be increased. The potential for human exposure to iodine is therefore also increased.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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