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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: High dose lycopene supplementation increases hepatic CYP2E1 protein and TNF-alpha expression in alcohol fed rats

Authors
item Veeramachaneni, Sudipta - JM USDA HNRCA @ TUFTS
item Wang, Xiang-Dong

Submitted to: Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2007
Publication Date: April 4, 2008
Citation: Veeramachaneni, S., Wang, X. 2008. High dose lycopene supplementation increases hepatic CYP2E1 protein and TNF-alpha expression in alcohol fed rats. Experimental Biology Annual Meeting. April 5-9, 2008, San Diego, CA.

Technical Abstract: Lycopene (LYC) has attracted considerable attention due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, in vivo knowledge of possible interactions between escalating doses of LYC and chronic alcohol ingestion are lacking. F-344 rats (6 groups, n = 10) were fed either a liquid ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet or a control diet with or without LYC for 11 weeks. Two doses of LYC were tested, 1.1 and 3.3 mg/kg BW/day, which are equivalent to 15 mg and 45 mg LYC/day in humans, respectively. Hepatic and plasma concentrations of LYC and its isomers (HPLC), hepatic cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) protein (Western Blotting) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) expression (qPCR) were assessed. A dose-dependent increase in plasma and hepatic LYC concentrations were observed in both control and alcohol fed rats. Hepatic LYC levels increased 74-157% and plasma LYC levels increased 48-127% (low and high dose, respectively) in alcohol fed rats vs. control rats supplemented with identical doses of LYC. Additionally, much lower concentrations of LYC cis isomers were observed in alcohol fed rats vs. controls. High dose LYC also significantly increased hepatic CYP2E1 and TNF-a in alcohol fed rats. These data indicate an interaction between chronic alcohol consumption and high dose LYC, suggesting a need for caution among individuals consuming high amounts of alcohol and LYC. (Supported by NIH grant R01CA104932).

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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