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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SORTING AGRICULTURAL MATERIALS FOR DEFECTS USING IMAGING AND PHYSICAL METHODS Title: High Speed Real Time Removal of Undesirable Product from Food Processing Lines

Author
item Haff, Ronald

Submitted to: UJNR Food & Agricultural Panel Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2007
Publication Date: October 21, 2007
Citation: Haff, R.P. 2007. High speed real time removal of undesirable product from food processing lines. UJNR Food & Agricultural Panel Proceedings, 36th Annual Meeting, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan, October 21-25, 2007, Vol. , pp

Interpretive Summary: Removal of undesirable defects and contaminants in food products is a concern for both food safety and food quality reasons. The presence of such materials is therefore a major component of quality grading standards. It can also have an effect on the accessibility of foreign markets and a producer’s ability to compete in those markets. Improved sorting capabilities therefore benefit both the industry and the consumer. Typical defects include physiological abnormalities and diseases, such as watercore disease in apples, as well as man made defects such as bruises on apples. Contaminants include unwanted pits, stones, metal, glass, etc. as well as biological contaminants such as insect, fungal, or bacterial infestation. The “imaging and sorting” group at WRRC has been developing real-time sorting technology for application in the food industry for over 20 years. Here we review the imaging and sorting capabilities at WRRC and how they have been applied to the development of sorting equipment in the context of encouraging collaboration between WRRC and Japanese researchers with similar or complimentary interests and capabilities.

Technical Abstract: Removal of undesirable defects and contaminants in food products is a concern for both food safety and food quality reasons. The presence of such materials is therefore a major component of quality grading standards. It can also have an effect on the accessibility of foreign markets and a producer's ability to compete in those markets. Improved sorting capabilities therefore benefit both the industry and the consumer. Typical defects include physiological abnormalities and diseases, such as watercore disease in apples, as well as man made defects such as bruises on apples. Contaminants include unwanted pits, stones, metal, glass, etc. as well as biological contaminants such as insect, fungal, or bacterial infestation. The imaging and sorting group at WRRC has been developing real-time sorting technology for application in the food industry for over 20 years. Here we review the imaging and sorting capabilities at WRRC and how they have been applied to the development of sorting equipment in the context of encouraging collaboration between WRRC and Japanese researchers with similar or complimentary interests and capabilities.

Last Modified: 12/17/2014
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