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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Observed Behavior of Frankliniella Thrips and Their Fecundity

Authors
item Hansen, Eric - FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY
item Reitz, Stuart

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 31, 2007
Publication Date: October 25, 2007
Citation: Hansen, E., Reitz, S.R. 2007. Observed behavior of frankliniella thrips and their fecundity. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Thrips feeding and ovipositing results in distortion, discoloration, stunting, and silvering of the fruits of vegetables and fruit crops. Thrips are commonly found on pepper in north Florida and can seriously deplete yields. Understanding thrips behavior and their reproductive potential is important for applying appropriate pest management strategies including the use of natural enemies. Therefore scientists with the Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology performed comparative studies of Frankliniella behavior and reproductive biology. All Frankliniella thrips fed and rested more on flowers than any other plant part of pepper. Females of F. occidentalis and F. tritici were more fecund during the first two weeks of adulthood than at any other time. The numbers of offspring produced per day for both Frankliniella species were similar, however the longevity of F. occidentalis tended to be longer than that of F. tritici.

Technical Abstract: Thrips feeding and ovipositing results in distortion, discoloration, stunting, and silvering of the fruits of vegetables and fruit crops. Thrips are commonly found on pepper in north Florida and can seriously deplete yields. Understanding thrips behavior and their reproductive potential is important for applying appropriate pest management strategies including the use of natural enemies. Therefore we performed comparative studies of Frankliniella behavior and reproductive biology. All Frankliniella thrips fed and rested more on flowers than any other plant part of pepper. Females of F. occidentalis and F. tritici were more fecund during the first two weeks of adulthood than at any other time. The numbers of offspring produced per day for both Frankliniella species were similar, however the longevity of F. occidentalis tended to be longer than that of F. tritici.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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