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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTER AND PIERCE'S DISEASE

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Expressed sequence tags from the black-winged sharpshooter: Application to biology and vector control

Authors
item Hunter, Wayne
item Mizell, Russ - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Tipping, C - DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE
item Dang, Phat
item Hunnicutt, Laura -

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 23, 2007
Publication Date: December 10, 2007
Citation: Hunter, W.B., Mizell, R., Tipping, C., Dang, P.M., Hunnicutt, L. 2007. Expressed sequence tags from the black-winged sharpshooter: Application to biology and vector control. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Pierce's Disease Research Symposium Annual Meeting, December 12-14, 2007, San Diego, California. p. 12-16

Interpretive Summary: We identified genes important for the survival of the black-winged sharpshooter, Oncometopia nigricans, which is considered a highly competent vector of several strains of the xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of a number of economically important plant diseases including Pierce’s disease, phony peach disease, plum leaf scald and periwinkle wilt. To better understand the biology of the this leafhopper on a molecular level, our lab undertook a large-scale 5' end expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project of cDNA clones derived from O. nigricans adults. Similar EST sequencing projects from other insect pests have definitively proven their worth in answering biological questions relating to organismal behavior, development and physiology. These data enable the identifications of target genes with potential for use and application within emerging novel genomics-based management strategies being developed to reduce leafhopper impacts on agricultural crops. We produced a dataset containing 4,411 high-quality ESTs, representing a set of 3,301 genetic sequences. Assembly identified 14 full-length sequences for proteins which have important biological functions. Two important cDNAs were the delta 9 desaturase, which functions in lipid synthesis, and an Imaginal Disc Growth Factor, IDGF, which functions in insect development. The sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to NCBI’s public database - accession numbers: DR755012-DR759538. Mining of the genomic data from this study provides rapid, cost effective insight into leafhopper biology, pathology and development which would be difficult by any other methods. The genomic data set for O. nigricans, has already produced valuable information on an important vector of plant diseases. This data provides the first experimental access to these genes and builds the foundation for more in-depth molecular and functional genomic analysis by the research community. Moreover, it identifies genes that are critical in the physiology, reproduction, and development of leafhoppers. Genetic information which is crucial to advancing our understanding of sharpshooter biology, and will which plays a major role in the development of future non-chemical, gene-based control strategies against leafhopper pests.

Technical Abstract: We identified 14 putative full-length transcripts of proteins important for the survival of the black-winged sharpshooter, BWSS, Oncometopia nigricans. The BWSS is considered a highly competent vector of several strains of the xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of a number of economically important plant diseases including Pierce’s disease, phony peach disease, plum leaf scald and periwinkle wilt. To advance our understanding of the genetic basis of leafhopper biology we undertook a large-scale 5' end expressed sequence tag, EST, sequencing project of cDNA clones derived from O. nigricans adults. Similar EST sequencing projects from other insects have definitively proven their worth in answering biological questions relating to development, physiology, and pathology. These data enable the identifications of genetic targets with potential for use and application within developing genomic-based management strategies aimed at reducing leafhopper pests and the impacts of Pierce’s disease. The dataset produced contains 4,411 high-quality ESTs, representing a set of 3,301 transcripts. Assembly identified 14 putative full-length transcripts. Two important cDNAs identified were the delta 9 desaturase and an Imaginal Disc Growth Factor, IDGF. The sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to NCBI’s dbEST under the following accession numbers: DR755012-DR759538. Data mining of the genomic data produced from this project provides rapid, cost effective insight into leafhopper biology, pathology and development which would be difficult by any other methods. This data provides the first experimental access to these genes and builds the foundation for more in-depth molecular and functional genomic analyses by the research community. Genetic information overall, is crucial to advancing our understanding of sharpshooter biology, and will play a major role in the development of future non-chemical, gene-based control strategies against leafhopper pests.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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