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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZING AND MANAGING ANIMAL STRESS/WELL-BEING IN LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION Title: Heat stress in feedlot cattle

Author
item Brown Brandl, Tami

Submitted to: CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 29, 2008
Publication Date: March 4, 2008
Citation: Brown Brandl, T.M. 2008. Heat stress in feedlot cattle. CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources. Vol. 3, No. 16. Available: www.cababstractsplus.org/cabreviews/reviews.asp or doi:10.1079/PAVSNNR20083016.

Interpretive Summary: Heat stress in feedlot cattle is a common summer time occurrence in cattle-producing parts of the world (United States, Australia, Brazil, etc.). The impact of heat stress on feedlot animals is quite varied. The level of heat stress an animal experiences can be broken down into three components: animal susceptibility, environmental conditions, and management strategies. This paper describes each of these three factors.

Technical Abstract: Heat stress in feedlot cattle is a common summer time occurrence in cattle-producing parts of the world (United States, Australia, Brazil, etc.). The impact of heat stress on feedlot animals is quite varied--from little to no effect in a brief exposure, to causing reductions in feed intake, growth, and well-being of the cattle in a moderate event, to death of vulnerable animals during an extreme event. The level of heat stress an animal experiences can be broken down into three primary factors: animal susceptibility, environmental conditions, and management strategies. Each of these factors can also be broken down into different elements. This paper describes the physical and physiological processes that describe homeostasis along with the factors affecting animal susceptibility, methods of summarizing environmental conditions, and management strategies that can be used to relieve stress.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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