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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dietary calcium intake, body size, and body composition in the Training Intervention and Genetics of Exercise Response study

Authors
item Callie, Margaret - UNIV. OF HOUSTON
item Jackson, Andrew - UNIV. OF HOUSTON
item Bray, Molly

Submitted to: Obesity
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 12, 2006
Publication Date: October 3, 2006
Citation: Callie, M., Jackson, A., Bray, M. 2006. Dietary calcium intake, body size, and body composition in the Training Intervention and Genetics of Exercise Response study [abstract]. Obesity. 14(Suppl):A254.

Technical Abstract: Increased calcium intake has been associated with lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), and adiposity measures in cross-sectional studies, as well as randomized clinical trials. However, much of the research on dietary calcium and body size to date has focused only on Caucasian, middle-aged men and women, indicating a need for additional research in other age and race/ethnicity groups. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of dietary calcium intake, derived from the 98 Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) with weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist/hip ratio (WHR), and body composition measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a multi-ethnic group of young adults. Subjects in this study included 330 women and 177 men, age 18-30 y, participating in the Training Intervention and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Subjects were divided into groups according to energy-adjusted dietary calcium intake quartiles. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association between dietary calcium intake and weight, BMI, WC, WHR, percent body fat (%BFat), and percent trunk fat (%TFat). Logistic regression was used to determine whether dietary calcium intake was associated with disease risk cutpoints defined by BMI, WC, and WHR. Analyses were stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and by gender and race/ethnicity. Dietary calcium intake of Hispanic women (n=89) was inversely associated with WC, WHR, %BFat, %TFat, and overweight/obesity. No significant association between dietary calcium and any measure of body size was observed for any other race/ethnicity and/or gender group. The results from this study indicate that race/ethnicity and gender may impact the effect of dietary calcium intake upon adiposity. These findings reinforce the need for additional focus upon multi-ethnic populations to assess the effects of dietary calcium on body size and body composition.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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