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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED BIOSYSTEMATICS AND TAXONOMY FOR PARASITES AMONG UNGULATES AND OTHER VERTEBRATES Title: Pathogens of Domestic and Free-Ranging Ungulates: Global Climate Change in Temperate to Boreal Latitudes Across North America

Authors
item Hoberg, Eric
item Polley, Lydden - SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA
item Jenkins, Emily - SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA
item Kutz, Susan - U CALGARY, CANADA

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Office International Des Epizooties World Association of
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 12, 2007
Publication Date: August 1, 2008
Citation: Hoberg, E.P., Polley, L., Jenkins, E.J., Kutz, S.J. 2008. Pathogens of domestic and free-ranging ungulates: Global climate change in temperate to boreal latitudes across North America. Proceedings of the World Association of Office International Des Epizooties. 27:511-528.

Interpretive Summary: : Climate change represents one of a number of factors that may influence the distribution and emergence of pathogens and disease. Across a continuum linking abiotic and biotic factors as determinants of emergence, the pervasive impact of rapid climate change on the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is considered to be paramount. We explore the current situation for development of strategic planning for responses to an array of parasites that infect livestock and wild ungulates in the United States and Canada. In North America broad-based research networks address the interaction of vertebrates, their characteristic arrays of microparasites (prions, viruses, bacteria and protozoans) and macroparasites (helminthes and arthropods), and emergent disease. Collectively a diversity of disparate programs relate to animal health, zoonoses, human health and the impact of environmental change on the distribution of complex host-parasite systems among domestic livestock and wild ungulates. Although many studies are pertinent to global climate change, as yet no comprehensive framework or strategy has emerged at agency, interagency, state or provincial, and national or international levels to implement policy and planning. There is an urgency to document and understand the health, agricultural, societal and economic impact of parasites and emerging infectious disease in a regime of climate change and ecological perturbation. An integrated and proactive planning process linking national and international resources, can lead to informed predictions about the impact of environmental change and can identify pathways for potential management and mitigation. An effective and comprehensive program will have components for establishing priorities, developing primary data for faunal structure and biodiversity, a capacity for monitoring and surveillance (including scanning and targeted activities), and linkage to historical and contemporary baselines (against which to assess change) established through archival biological collections. Field and laboratory studies to determine developmental thresholds and tolerances are also necessary to establish the current and future constraints, or factors that promote emergence for a variety of parasites, vectors and pest species. Predictive modeling and risk assessment utilizing a range of scenarios for climate change represents a final step in this multidisciplinary process.

Technical Abstract: In North America broad-based research networks explore the interaction of vertebrates, their characteristic arrays of pathogens and emergent disease. Collectively a diversity of disparate programs address animal health, zoonoses, human health and the impact on these of environmental change, but as yet no comprehensive framework or strategy has emerged to develop and implement policy and planning. There is urgency to document and understand the health, agricultural, societal and economic impact of pathogens and emerging infectious disease in a regime of climate change and ecological perturbation. An integrated and proactive planning process linking national and international resources can lead to informed predictions about the impact of environmental change and can identify pathways for potential management and mitigation. An effective and comprehensive program will have components for establishing priorities, developing primary data for faunal structure and biodiversity, a capacity for monitoring and surveillance (including scanning and targeted activities), and linkage to historical and contemporary baselines (against which to assess change) established through archival biological collections. Field and laboratory studies to determine developmental thresholds and tolerances are also necessary for many pathogens to establish a context for current and future constraints, and to explore factors that promote emergence for a variety of pathogens, vectors and pest species. Predictive modeling and risk assessment utilizing a range of scenarios for climate change represents a final step in this multidisciplinary process.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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