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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCED END USE QUALITY AND UTILIZATION OF SORGHUM GRAIN

Location: Grain Quality and Structure Research Unit

Title: Manufacture of gluten-free specialty breads and confectionery products

Author
item Schober, Tilman

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2008
Publication Date: June 1, 2009
Citation: Schober, T.J. 2009. Manufacture of Gluten-free Specialty Breads and Confectionery Products. In: Gluten-Free Food Science and Technology. Gallagher, E. editor. Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, NJ p. 130–180.

Technical Abstract: People suffering from celiac disease, wheat allergies or wheat intolerances require breads not containing any wheat or related cereals like rye and barley. The manufacture of these so-called gluten-free breads is not well understood and much less literature is available than on wheat breads. On the other hand, a growing market for gluten-free breads can be expected, as diagnostic tools improve and more people are aware of having celiac disease or other conditions requiring a wheat-free diet. This bookchapter explains the theoretical and practical aspects of the production of gluten-free breads, and also cakes and biscuits. Formulations for breads from isolated starches, and from sorghum, rice, maize flours and flour mixtures are presented and the underlying physicochemical principles explained. Literature from five decades is interpreted and supplemented with the author’s own experiments, addressing classical and novel approaches. The chapter provides in depth explanations for students and scientists with a strong theoretical interest, as well as short summaries of the most relevant facts for applied people with a more practical background. Summarizing these details in a bookchapter helps to spread knowledge on gluten-free bread production and can therefore contribute to improved quality of commercial gluten-free breads available to Americans and people worldwide, and to new markets for agricultural products from the U.S. like food-grade sorghum.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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