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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL ENEMIES

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: History of turfgrass breeding at the University of Florida

Authors
item Kenworthy, Kevin - UNIV OF FL
item Nagata, Russell - UNIV OF FL
item SCULLY, BRIAN
item Busey, Philip - UNIV OF FL
item Dudeck, Albert - PROFESSOR EMERITUS

Submitted to: Trade Journal Publication
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 2007
Publication Date: August 1, 2007
Citation: Kenworthy, K.E., Nagata, R.T., Scully, B.T., Busey, P., Dudeck, A.E. 2007. History of turfgrass breeding at the University of Florida. Florida Turf Digest. 24(4):10-14.

Interpretive Summary: Turfgrass grown in Florida must be adapted to an array of environments that range from low-input roadside landscapes, to moderate and high value home landscapes and to some of the most intensively managed golf courses in the world. To complicate crop management in these environments, several abiotic and biotic stresses prevail throughout the state and can hinder the performance of any given variety. Crop diseases, insects and nematodes afflict many turfgrass species along with heat, drought, shade and heavy traffic. Florida turfgrass breeders have developed and released 19 turfgrass cultivars across six different species, including Bahiagrass, Bermudagrass, Centipedegrass, Seashore Paspalum, St. Augustinegrass and Zoysiagrass. The goal of many of these research programs was not only to develop cultivars with host plant resistance or tolerance to abiotic stress, but also to include desirable agronomic and horticultural traits that fit the unique needs of specific turf application.

Technical Abstract: Turfgrass grown in Florida must be adapted to an array of environments that range from low-input roadside landscapes, to moderate and high value home landscapes and to some of the most intensively managed golf courses in the world. To complicate crop management in these environments, several abiotic and biotic stresses prevail throughout the state and can hinder the performance of any given variety. Crop diseases, insects and nematodes afflict many turfgrass species along with heat, drought, shade and heavy traffic. Florida turfgrass breeders have developed and released 19 turfgrass cultivars across six different species, including Bahiagrass, Bermudagrass, Centipedegrass, Seashore Paspalum, St. Augustinegrass and Zoysiagrass. The goal of many of these research programs was not only to develop cultivars with host plant resistance or tolerance to abiotic stress, but also to include desirable agronomic and horticultural traits that fit the unique needs of specific turf application.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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