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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE Title: Reduction in fitness of female Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) infected with Metarhizium anisopliae

Authors
item Lund, Jennifer - CORNELL UNIV ITHACA NY
item Smith, Michael
item Hajek, Ann - CORNELL UNIV ITHACA MY

Submitted to: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2007
Publication Date: June 20, 2008
Citation: Lund, J., Smith, M.T., Hajek, A.E. 2008. Reduction in fitness of female Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) infected with Metarhizium anisopliae. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 98(2):198-205.

Interpretive Summary: Studies were conducted to determine if infection of adult female Asian Longhorned beetles (ALB) by two specific pathogenic fungi can effectively reduce their reproduction and survival, and the subsequent survival of their offspring. Results showed both fungi significantly reduced the number of days that female ALB survived, and the number of eggs they laid. Furthermore, among the eggs that were laid, infection also reduced the number that hatched. Among the eggs that hatched, infection also reduced the number of days they survived. In summary, results indicate that infection of female ALB by both fungi have potential to control ALB.

Technical Abstract: Bioassays were conducted to document the effects of Metarhizium anisopliae infection of adult female Anoplophora glabripennis on reproduction before female death and subsequent survival of offspring. The effect of infection on fecundity was evaluated for both newly eclosed females and females already laying eggs using two different strains of M. anisopliae. Newly eclosed females exposed to M. anisopliae ARSEF 7234 displayed shortened longevity (10.0 days vs. 74.3 days for controls) and decreased fecundity (0.8 surviving larvae per ARSEF 7234-exposed female vs. 37.0 surviving larvae for controls). Similar trends of decreased longevity and fecundity were observed in females that had already been laying eggs when exposed to M. anisopliae ARSEF 7711 and ARSEF 7234 when compared with controls. For both isolates, females that were already ovipositing when inoculated with conidia laid fewer eggs than healthy females resulting in fewer surviving larvae after exposure. Percentages of both eggs that did not hatch and larvae that died indicated signs of infection. In summary, results indicate that M. anisopliae fungal infection affects female A. glabripennis fitness both by decreasing longevity as well as decreasing fecundity before death.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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