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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL APPLICATION OF AGRICULTURAL WASTE TO IMPROVE CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Title: Production of Buddleia davidii and Verbena Canadensis in Clean Chip Residual

Authors
item Boyer, C - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Fain, G - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Gilliam, C - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Torbert, Henry
item Gallagher, T - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Sibley, J - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Southern Nursery Association Research Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 8, 2007
Publication Date: August 8, 2007
Citation: Boyer, C.R., Fain, G.B., Gilliam, C.H., Torbert III, H.A., Gallagher, T.V., Sibley, J.L. 2007. Production of Buddleia davidii and Verbena Canadensis in Clean Chip Residual. In: Proceedings of the Southern Nursery Association Research Conference, August 8-9, 2007, Atlanta, Georgia. 52:489-491.

Interpretive Summary: A trend away from traditional forestry practices towards in-field harvesting of pine trees coupled with an increase in use of pine bark in other industries has resulted in a decrease in the availability of pine bark cost for nursery growers. Recent research has discovered a viable option in the forest residual product Clean Chip Residual, which is left behind when in-field harvesting of pine trees for “clean chips” occurs. This study evaluated growth of Buddleia in various substrates of different mixtures of pine bark, Clean Chip Residual and peat moss. Similarities among treatments in this study indicate that CCR is a viable substrate option for containerized plant production in nurseries.

Technical Abstract: A trend away from traditional forestry practices towards in-field harvesting of pine trees coupled with an increase in use of pine bark in other industries has resulted in a decrease in the availability of pine bark cost for nursery growers. Recent research has discovered a viable option in the forest residual product Clean Chip Residual, which is left behind when in-field harvesting of pine trees for “clean chips” occurs. This study evaluated growth of Buddleia davidii ‘Pink Delight’ and Verbena canadensis ‘Homestead Purple’ in various substrates. Treatments included 100% pine bark (PB; from two sources, Alabama and Mississippi), 100% Clean Chip Residual (CCR) in two screen sizes (3/4” and ½”), and mixtures of these materials on a 4:1 basis with peat moss. Similarities among treatments in this study indicate that CCR is a viable substrate option for containerized plant production in nurseries. Plant growth among species in this test were similar compared to control plants, indicating that plant growth in CCR substrates are comparable to those grown in pine bark. Few differences in plant growth were recorded indicating that CCR is a feasible alternative to pine bark for container-grown nursery crop production.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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