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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluating a Wood-strand Material for Wind Erosion Control and Air Quality Protection

Authors
item Copeland, Natalie - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Sharratt, Brenton
item Foltz, Randy - US FOREST SERVICE
item Wu, Joan - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Dooley, Jim - FOREST CONCEPTS, LLC

Submitted to: Proceedings of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International (ASABE)
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 20, 2007
Publication Date: June 20, 2007
Citation: Copeland, N., Sharratt, B.S., Foltz, R., Wu, J., Dooley, J. 2007. Evaluating a Wood-strand Material for Wind Erosion Control and Air Quality Protection. Proceedings of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International (ASABE).

Technical Abstract: Fugitive dust from eroding land poses both environmental quality and human health problems in the western United States. Since the advent of the Clean Air Act in 1990, regulations have been imposed on particulate matter in the atmosphere. Agricultural straw has been widely used for erosion control; however, straw lacks stability during high wind events and is a source of noxious weeds and chemical residues. Forest Concepts, LLC., has been designing a new wood-based product for erosion control as an alternative to agricultural straw. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the new wood strand material in controlling wind erosion at three different wind speeds (6.5, 11, and 18 m/s). A series of wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate material properties in terms of total sediment loss and air quality maintenance. Data obtained from these tests is intended to provide information that will aid in the design of the wood strand material specifically for wind erosion mitigation. Preliminary results indicate that wood strands are stable at wind speeds of up to 18 m/s, while straw is only stable at wind speeds of up to 6.5 m/s. Wood strands were able to reduce total sediment loss and peak dust emissions both by over 90% when compared to a bare soil at a wind velocity of 18 m/s.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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