Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: WEED BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY, AND DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR COTTON, SOYBEAN, CORN

Location: Crop Production Systems Research Unit

Title: Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) Control with Preemergence and Postemergence Herbicides

Authors
item Reddy, Krishna
item Bryson, Charles
item Burke, Ian - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 30, 2007
Publication Date: January 3, 2008
Citation: Reddy, K.N., Bryson, C.T., Burke, I.C. 2008. Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) Control with Preemergence and Postemergence Herbicides. Weed Technology 21:982-986.

Interpretive Summary: Ragweed parthenium is an invasive non-native weed with increased frequency of detection in the southern US. Research on control of ragweed parthenium with herbicides in the US is mostly lacking. Scientists at Southern Weed Science Research Unit, Stoneville, MS have conducted studies to control of ragweed parthenium with several preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) herbicides registered for use in corn, cotton, peanut, rice, and soybean. Norflurazon, clomazone, fluometuron, metribuzin, diuron, and flumioxazin provided excellent PRE control of ragweed parthenium. Glyphosate, glufosinate, chlorimuron, and trifloxysulfuron applied at rosette-stage provided excellent control of ragweed parthenium. At bolted-stage, glyphosate, glufosinate, and trifloxysulfuron controlled greater than 86% of ragweed parthenium. Overall, efficacy of POST herbicides was better on rosette plants than on bolted plants. These findings indicate that norflurazon, clomazone, fluometuron, flumioxazin, halosulfuron, and trifloxysulfuron could provide effective control of ragweed parthenium in the crops for which they are labeled.

Technical Abstract: Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted during 2005 and 2006 at Stoneville, MS to determine control of ragweed parthenium with several preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) herbicides registered for use in corn, cotton, peanut, rice, and soybean. Norflurazon, pendimethalin, clomazone, diuron, fluometuron, pyrithiobac, dimethenamid, flumetsulam, imazaquin, S-metolachlor, metribuzin, chlorimuron, atrazine, simazine, flumioxazin, and quinclorac were applied PRE. Ragweed parthenium control was highest with norflurazon (100%) and clomazone (100%) followed by fluometuron (96%), metribuzin (90%), diuron (87%), flumioxazin (84%), chlorimuron (77%), and quinclorac (67%) at 6 wk after treatment (WAT) under greenhouse conditions. Control of ragweed parthenium was less than 58% with all other herbicides. Ragweed parthenium appears to be highly sensitive to pigment and photosynthetic inhibitors compared to herbicides with other modes of action. Glyphosate, glufosinate, paraquat, bentazon, acifluorfen, chlorimuron, halosulfuron, MSMA, bromoxynil, atrazine, 2,4-D, flumioxazin, trifloxysulfuron, and clomazone were applied POST to field-grown rosette and bolted plants. Glyphosate, glufosinate, chlorimuron, and trifloxysulfuron applied at rosette-stage provided greater than 93% control of ragweed parthenium at 3 WAT. Halosulfuron, MSMA, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, and flumioxazin controlled 58 to 90% rosette ragweed parthenium at 3 WAT. Ragweed parthenium control with all other POST herbicides was less than 38%. At bolted-stage, glyphosate, glufosinate, and trifloxysulfuron controlled 86 to 95% ragweed parthenium and control was 61 to 70% with chlorimuron, halosulfuron, and 2,4-D. Overall, efficacy of POST herbicides was better on rosette plants than on bolted plants. Amino acid synthesis and glutamine synthase inhibitors were more active than herbicides with other modes of action. These results indicate that norflurazon, clomazone, fluometuron, flumioxazin, halosulfuron, and trifloxysulfuron could provide effective control of ragweed parthenium.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page