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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL AND PROTECTION TOOLS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF MOSQUITOES AND FILTH FLIES

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Distribution and abundance of natural parasitoid (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) populations of house flies and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) at the University of Florida Dairy Research Unit.

Authors
item Romero, Alvaro - UNIV OF KENTUCKY
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Coronado, Alfredo - UNIVERSIDAD CENTROCCIDENT

Submitted to: Neotropical Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2009
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: House flies and stable flies are the most pestiferous insects found on dairies. House flies annoy cattle and stable flies feed on the animals’ blood. Immature fly stages develop in manure and feed, and adults can fly to nearby homes. Managing these flies using parasitic wasps has become increasingly popular with producers. However, it is important to know the species complex and seasonality of the wasps in problem areas. Therefore, scientists at the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL, worked with scientists at the University of Kentucky and the Universidad Centroccidental "Lisandro Alvarado" to document the parasitic wasp species and the species complex found in northcentral Florida. The most common wasp parasitoids attacking house fly and stable fly pupae were Spalangia endius (33.9 and 27.3%), S. cameroni (27.9 and 40.6%), and S. nigroaenea (21.0 and 24.8%), respectively. Two new species were recovered in Florida.

Technical Abstract: Management of house fly and stable fly populations with commercially produced parasitic wasp has become increasingly popular because no pesticides are involved. A field evaluation was performed in northcentral Florida to document local wasp species and their prevalence during the year. Samples were collected weekly for 13 months. Results will allow commercial insectaries to produce parasite species native to the area and species which are naturally abundant during problem periods. The most common wasp parasitoids attacking house fly and stable fly pupae were Spalangia endius (33.9 and 27.3%) in winter, S. cameroni (27.9 and 40.6%) year round, and S. nigroaenea (21.0 and 24.8%) in summer, respectively. Two new species were recovered in Florida.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014