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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cotton Arthropod IPM

Authors
item Naranjo, Steven
item Luttrell, Randall - UN OF AR, FAYETTEVILLE, A

Submitted to: Integrated Pest Management
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2008
Publication Date: April 1, 2009
Citation: Naranjo, S.E., Luttrell, R.G. 2009. Cotton Arthropod IPM. Integrated Pest Management, p. 324-340.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton is the world’s most important natural source of fiber, accounting for almost 40% of total worldwide production. The crop is grown in more than 75 countries with a total production in 2006 of 25.4 billion kg. The U.S. produced 21.7 million bales in 2006 in a diversity of production environments over 17 states. Crop loss to insects and mites has generally declined in the past 10 years which represents a marked improvement in crop protection technologies and practices. Approximately 20 arthropods are consistent pests of cotton in the US and cotton fields also harbor a diverse assemblage of natural enemies that play a key role in keeping many more potential pests under control. A variety of control tactics can be integrated into management strategies for cotton pests including chemical, cultural, behavioral and biological control and well as host plant resistance. This latter approach includes the use of transgenic cottons that have been genetically engineering to resist caterpillar pests through the expression of a highly specific bacterial toxin. Sampling and use of economic thresholds are key components in modern pest management and are routinely used in all production areas of the US. Examples of successful programs for whitefly in the western US and plant bugs in the Midsouth region of the US are discussed as case studies.

Technical Abstract: Cotton is the world’s most important natural source of fiber, accounting for almost 40% of total worldwide production. The crop is grown in more than 75 countries with a total production in 2006 of 25.4 billion kg. The U.S. produced 21.7 million bales in 2006 in a diversity of production environments over 17 states. Crop loss to insects and mites has generally declined in the past 10 years which represents a marked improvement in crop protection technologies and practices. Approximately 20 arthropods are consistent pests of cotton in the US and cotton fields also harbor a diverse assemblage of natural enemies that play a key role in keeping many more potential pests under control. A variety of control tactics can be integrated into management strategies for cotton pests including chemical, cultural, behavioral and biological control and well as host plant resistance. This latter approach includes the use of transgenic cottons that have been genetically engineering to resist caterpillar pests through the expression of a highly specific bacterial toxin. Sampling and use of economic thresholds are key components in modern pest management and are routinely used in all production areas of the US. Examples of successful programs for whitefly in the western US and plant bugs in the Midsouth region of the US are discussed as case studies.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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