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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR FIELD AND GREENHOUSE CROPS Title: Size-dependent suitability of two mirids as prey for the cursorial spider Hibana futilis (Araneae: Anyphaenidae).

Authors
item Pfannenstiel, Robert
item Greenberg, Shoil
item Coleman, Randy
item Suh, Charles

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 2, 2007
Publication Date: July 5, 2007
Citation: Pfannenstiel, R.S., Greenberg, S.M., Coleman, R.J., Suh, C.P. 2007. Size-dependent suitability of two mirids as prey for the cursorial spider Hibana futilis (Araneae: Anyphaenidae). National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference, January 9-12, 2007, New Orleans, Louisiana. p. 370-374.

Interpretive Summary: The ability of 2nd and 4th instars and adult females of the spider, Hibana futilis, to prey on different sizes of two plant bug pests of cotton was examined. Small and large juveniles and adults of the cotton fleahopper and Creontiades signatus were exposed to individual spiders for 24 h to determine if they would be fed on. Both, the cotton fleahopper and C. signatus were consumed by the spiders. Second instar spiders attacked and consumed only small cotton fleahopper nymphs. However, 4th instar spiders consumed all cotton fleahopper stages. Second instar spiders did not consume any C. signatus. The 4th instar spiders attacked small and large nymphs of C. signatus but only small numbers of the large nymphs. Adult female spiders readily consumed all stages of C. signatus tested thus far (adults bugs have not been evaluated yet). Juvenile spiders were able to feed on more cotton fleahoppers than the larger C. signatus. This study suggests that this spider has the potential to be an important predator of the cotton fleahopper and should be evaluated under more realistic settings.

Technical Abstract: The ability of 2nd and 4th instars and adult females of the cursorial spider, Hibana futilis (Banks), to prey on different stages of two mirid pests of cotton was examined. Small nymphs, large nymphs, and adults of the cotton fleahopper, Pseudomatoscelis seriatus (Reuter) and Creontiades signatus (Distant) (Hemiptera: Miridae) were exposed to individual H. futilis for 24 h to determine their suitability as prey. Both, the cotton fleahopper and C. signatus were consumed by H. futilis. Second instar H. futilis attacked and consumed only small cotton fleahopper nymphs, however, 4th instars consumed all stages that were presented to them. Second instar H. futilis did not consume any C. signatus. The larger 4th instar H. futilis attacked small and large nymphs of C. signatus but in relatively small numbers for the large nymphs. Adult female H. futilis readily consumed all stages of C. signatus tested thus far (adults have not been evaluated yet). Juvenile H. futilis were able to attack and consume more cotton fleahoppers than the larger C. signatus. This study suggests that H. futilis has the potential to be an important predator of the cotton fleahopper and should be evaluated under more realistic settings.

Last Modified: 9/3/2014
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