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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF UNDESIRABLE MIBROBES AND OFF-FLAVORS IN AQUACULTURE WITH NATURAL PRODUCTS

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Compounds with Inhibitory Activity Against the Channel Catfish Pathogens Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare

Author
item Schrader, Kevin

Submitted to: North American Journal of Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 22, 2007
Publication Date: February 7, 2008
Citation: Schrader, K. 2008. Compounds with Inhibitory Activity Against the Channel Catfish Pathogens Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. North American Journal of Aquaculture. 70:147-153.

Interpretive Summary: A large number of compounds, mostly natural compounds, were evaluated in a laboratory bioassay for their toxicity towards the bacteria that cause the two most common types of bacterial diseases in farm-raised channel catfish. Tannic acid and sodium percarbonate were found to be the most promising compounds for future efficacy testing to determine their potential use as therapeutants in managing these bacterial diseases.

Technical Abstract: Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and columnaris, the most common channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus diseases in the southeastern United States, are caused by the bacteria Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare, respectively. Although producers may rely on antibiotics and certain therapeutants to help manage these diseases, the discovery of new compounds that are environmentally safe and efficacious alternatives to current antibiotics and therapeutants would benefit the catfish aquaculture industry. A rapid bioassay was used to evaluate compounds as the first step in the discovery process. Tannic acid was found to be highly toxic towards E. ictaluri and F. columnare, and it appears to be promising for future efficacy testing against ESC and columnaris. Sodium percarbonate, an environmentally-safe compound, appears to be promising for future efficacy testing to determine its potential use in managing and preventing F. columnare outbreaks in small-scale systems used to culture catfish or during the transport of catfish.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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