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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF PESTS AFFECTING COTTON: PLANT GENETICS, BIOCONTROL, AND NOVEL METHODS OF PEST ESTIMATION Title: Registration of SJ-U86 Cotton Germplasm Line with High Yield and Excellent Fiber Quality.

Authors
item Ulloa, Mauricio
item Percy, Richard
item Hutmacher, Robert - UC-DAVIS, SHAFTER, CA
item Cantrell, Roy - COTTON INCORPORATED

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 31, 2006
Publication Date: September 1, 2006
Citation: Ulloa, M., Percy, R.G., Hutmacher, R., Cantrell, R.G. 2006. Registration of SJ-U86 Cotton Germplasm Line with High Yield and Excellent Fiber Quality. Crop Science. 46:2336-2338.

Interpretive Summary: The cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm line SJ¬U86 (Reg. no. GP-868; PI 642414 and NSSL 441398.01) was developed by USDA-ARS and Cotton Incorporated, and jointly released with the University of California in 2006. The need to improve cotton variety performance above current baselines, it is essential, and new genetic variability needs to be introduced into elite germplasm pools. The primary reason for the release of the SJ-U86 line as an alternative germplasm choice is its significantly higher lint yield and higher lint percent when compared with those of well-known Acala high-quality cottons, with no overall sacrifice of fiber quality. In addition to its superior performance in the San Joaquin Valley of California, SJ-U86 performs much better in the heat stress environment of Maricopa, AZ, where Acala cultivars Maxxa (1363 kg ha-1) and Phytogen 72 (1583 kg ha-1) yield poorly. In the hot environment of Maricopa, SJ-U86 yields slightly less than its heat-tolerant parent, SG 248 (2071 kg ha-1), but with significant improvement in almost all fiber quality traits. This combination of heat resistance similar to SG 248 with fiber quality that matches Maxxa and Phytogen 72 suggests that SJ-U86 could be a source of improved heat resistance for California cottons. It might also serve as a source of improved fiber quality for heat stressed environments such as the low deserts of Arizona.

Technical Abstract: The cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm line SJ¬U86 (Reg. no. GP-868; PI 642414 and NSSL 441398.01) was developed by USDA-ARS and Cotton Incorporated, and jointly released with the University of California in 2006. This line possesses superior lint yield, fiber length, and competitive fiber strength under heat stress environments compared with Acala cottons of California. For public and private breeders in the far west, especially in California, SJ-U86 provides an alternative source for improving heat tolerance in Acala cottons because of its excellent yield and fiber characteristics. SJ-U86 line originated from the cross of commercial cultivars FiberMax 958 and SG248. The pedigree of FiberMax 958 is CS6S/’SiokraS-324’//’SicalaV-1’ and the pedigree of SG248 is Mo89–117/‘DP5415’. The cultivar SG248 yields well in heat stress environments. The cultivar FiberMax 958 has relatively moderate yields under high temperature conditions in the far west USA but has very good fiber quality characteristics. The yield of SJ-U86 at Shafter, CA, 2219 kg/ha, was statistically superior to its parental lines, FiberMax 958 (1708 kg ha-1) and SG248 (1712 kg ha-1), by almost 30%, Acala cotton Phytogen 72 (1907 kg ha-1) by 15%, and that of the new release, AGC 375 (2030 kg ha-1 ), by 9%. Fiber length uniformity of SJ-U86 (82.9%) was comparable to that of FiberMax 958 (82.5%), and Acala cultivars, Phytogen 72 (83.5 %) and Maxxa (83.5 %). Most notably, SJ-U86 had significantly greater fiber bundle strength than either of its parents, 34.0 cN versus a mean of 31.9 cN. The Micronaire value of SJ-U86 (5.0) was lower than that of FiberMax 958 (5.3) or Phytogen 72 (5.3). Fiber fineness (AFIS) of SJ-U86 (178 mtex) was lower than that of FiberMax 958 (181mtex) and similar to Phytogen 72 (178mtex). The overall quality of SJ-U86 fiber was also equal to or better than that of traditional Acala varieties grown as checks.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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