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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE Title: Microbial control of Asian longhorned beetles: What are fungal bands?

Authors
item Hajek, A.E., - UNIVERSITY OF CORNELL
item Dubois, T., - UNIVERSITY OF CORNELL
item Lund, J., - UNIVERSITY OF CORNELL
item SHANLEY,R., - UNIVERSITY OF CORNELL
item Bauer, L, - USDA FOREST SERVICE
item Smith, Michael
item Fan, P., - ANHUI AGRICULTURAL UNIV
item Bo, H., - ANHUI AGRICULTURAL UNIV
item Jiafu, H., - ANHUI AGRICULTURAL UNIV
item Li, Z., - ANHUI AGRICULTURAL UNIV

Submitted to: USDA Interagency Research Forum on Gypsy Moth and Other Invasive Species
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 15, 2006
Publication Date: May 20, 2007
Citation: Hajek, A.E., Dubois, T., Lund, J., Shanley,R., Bauer, L, Smith, M.T., Fan, P., Bo, H., Jiafu, H., Li, Z. 2007. Microbial control of Asian Longhorned Beetles: What are fungal bands? USDA Interagency Research Forum on Gypsy Moth and Other Invasive Species. 2006, GTR-NRS-P-10.

Interpretive Summary: In Japan, fungi that kill insects are grown in non-woven fiber bands that are placed around trunks of orchard trees for control of numerous wood-borers, including the Citrus Longhorned beetle, a close relative of the Asian Longhorned beetle (ALB). The Japanese company producing bands, Nitto Denko in Osaka, markets bands produced from wood pulp. Our research program has emphasized development of methods for biological control of ALB in the U.S. using similar fungal bands. Initial studies resulted in development of rearing methods for ALB in quarantine and for differentiating male and female adult beetles, and isolation and identification of insect-killing fungal pathogens of ALB in China. Subsequent studies resulted in determining the effectiveness of different insect-killing fungal pathogens to kill ALB larvae and adult beetles in lab and field studies, and determining how many days different insect-killing fungal pathogens continue to effectively kill ALB in field studies. Present studies focus on the effects of fungal infection on egg production of adult female beetles and the effects of contamination of male beetles by infected female beetles. Details on the production and application of fiber bands containing the fungal pathogens and on how these fungi kill ALB are presented in this paper.

Technical Abstract: In Japan, the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria brongniartii is grown in non-woven fiber bands that are placed around trunks of orchard trees for control of numerous cerambycid pests, including Anoplophora chinensis (= A. malasiaca). The Japanese company producing bands, Nitto Denko in Osaka, markets bands produced from wood pulp. Our research program has emphasized developing a method for biological control of Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) in the U.S. using similar fungal bands. Initial studies resulted in development of rearing methods for ALB in quarantine and for differentiating male and female adult beetles, and in the isolation and identification of entomopathogenic fungal pathogens of ALB in China. Subsequent studies resulted in determining the effectiveness of: (a) 28 isolates of 5 species of entomopathogenic fungi (B. brongniartii, Metarhizium anisopliae, Paecilomyces farinosus, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus and B. bassiana) against ALB larvae and adults in lab studies; and (b) 3 entomopathogenic fungal species on bands against ALB in cage and non-cage field studies. More recent studies have determined the persistence of fungal band activity against adult ALB using 5 different fungal isolates, and the effects of fungal infection on fecundity of adult females and contamination of males by inoculated females. Details on the production and application of fiber bands containing the entomopathogenic fungi and on their mode of action in killing ALB are presented in this paper.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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