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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PEST BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE Title: Impact of corn variety on potential predators of larval corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Diabrotica spp.)

Authors
item Prischmann, Deirdre
item Dashiell, Kenton

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 26, 2006
Publication Date: October 31, 2006
Citation: Prischmann, D.A., Dashiell, K.E. 2006. Impact of corn variety on potential predators of larval corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Diabrotica spp.). Meeting Abstract available at www.ncera125.ent.msu.edu/.

Interpretive Summary: Corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Diabrotica spp.) are serious pests of maize around the world. Larvae feed on corn roots, which reduces uptake of water and nutrients and lowers plant yield. Current control practices rely on soil insecticides or genetically modified corn varieties. Although some researchers have investigated natural enemies of adult rootworms, there is a lack of information on predators and parasites that attack soil-dwelling, immature corn rootworm stages. In 2006, we conducted a replicated field study to explore how corn variety impacted density of larval corn rootworms and potential subterranean predators, including ground beetle larvae and predatory mites. Corn varieties tested included two commercially available hybrids, and a corn rootworm resistant Bt variety and its susceptible isoline. Weekly soil cores were taken from June through July, and arthropods extracted using berlese funnels.

Technical Abstract: Corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Diabrotica spp.) are serious pests of maize around the world. Larvae feed on corn roots, which reduces uptake of water and nutrients and lowers plant yield. Current control practices rely on soil insecticides or genetically modified corn varieties. Although some researchers have investigated natural enemies of adult rootworms, there is a lack of information on predators and parasites that attack soil-dwelling, immature corn rootworm stages. In 2006, we conducted a replicated field study to explore how corn variety impacted density of larval corn rootworms and potential subterranean predators, including ground beetle larvae and predatory mites. Corn varieties tested included two commercially available hybrids, and a corn rootworm resistant Bt variety and its susceptible isoline. Weekly soil cores were taken from June through July, and arthropods extracted using berlese funnels.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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