Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nutritional management of infants and children with specific diseases or other conditions

Authors
item Cooper, Arthur - COLUNBIA UNIV
item Heird, William

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2004
Publication Date: June 25, 2006
Citation: Cooper, A., Heird, W.C. 2006. Nutritional management of infants and children with specific diseases or other conditions. In: Shils, M.E., Shike, M., Ross, A.C., Caballero, B., Cousins, R.J., editors. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th edition. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 991-1003.

Technical Abstract: Cystic fibrosis is characterized by progressive deterioration of pulmonary and pancreatic function. The former may increase nutrient requirements somewhat, but probably affects nutrition more by adversely affecting intake, particularly during acute exacerbations and in older children with severe pulmonary disease. Pancreatic insufficiency severely limits the absorption of fat, a major energy source of most diets. Thus, the cause of malnutrition in infants and children with this disease can be both primary (i.e., inadequate nutrient intake) and secondary (i.e., fecal losses of protein, and particularly, of fat). The latter cause usually can be controlled with appropriate pancreatic enzyme replacement because there does not seem to be a primary defect in energy metabolism associated with the disease.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page