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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REARING AND RELEASE TECHNOLOGY FOR AUTOCIDAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF TEPHRITID FRUIT FLIES

Location: Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research

Title: Public and Private Partnerships in Area-wide Fruit Fly Pest Management for the Benefit of Farmers: The Hawaii Experience

Authors
item Mau, R - UNIV OF HAWAII
item Sugano, J - UNIV OF HAWAII
item Jang, Eric
item Vargas, Roger
item Wong, Lyle - HDOA

Submitted to: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Area-Wide Management of Insect Pests
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2006
Publication Date: October 5, 2006
Citation: Mau, R.L., Sugano, J.S., Jang, E.B., Vargas, R.I., Wong, L. 2006. Public and Private Partnerships in Area-wide Fruit Fly Pest Management for the Benefit of Farmers: The Hawaii Experience. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Area-Wide Management of Insect Pests. 19-29.

Interpretive Summary: In order to carry out successful pest management programs we need to have several factors in place. First, the resources, second, the technology and third, the ability to transfer this technology to end users to make the programs sustainable. The Hawaii Area-Wide Pest Management Program was set up specifically in this manner to utilize the resources, technology and skills of the program leaders to facilitate a sustainable program. The public/private partnerships were critical in development of a successful program.

Technical Abstract: Transfer of technologies to end-users (farmers and gardeners) are often locally and single agency outreach teaching programs. Actual outcomes and benefits are limited to localities or just a few farms. In recent years, there has been a focus on expanding benefits to larger regions. These programs have an area-wide focus and outcomes can be significant. In order to avoid the failures of past programs and produce significant, enduring outcomes, the Hawaii Area-Wide Fruit Fly Pest Management Program used a collaborative, public and private partnership model that shared responsibilities among the agencies. A second tenant was that users would learn best with a hands-on, personalized teaching method. All materials were provided to participants (cooperators) who agreed to use recommended fruit fly suppression practices.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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