Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Spatial Distribution of the Human Drug Carbamazepine in a Constructed Wetland Receiving Municipal Sewage Eflluent

Authors
item Williams, Clinton
item McLain, Jean
item Adamsen, Floyd

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 18, 2006
Publication Date: November 16, 2006
Citation: Williams, C.F., Mclain, J.E., Adamsen, F.J. 2006. Spatial Distribution of the Human Drug Carbamazepine in a Constructed Wetland Receiving Municipal Sewage Eflluent. Agronomy Abstracts. [CD-ROM P25327]

Technical Abstract: Artificially constructed wetlands offer a low cost treatment alternative to remove a number of pollutants found in effluent water from industry, mining, agriculture, and urban areas. Wetlands can be used to mechanically remove suspended solids through sedimentation. Dissolved nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), heavy metals, and potentially harmful anthropogenic compounds can all be removed in constructed wetlands through geochemical and biological processes. The anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine has been shown to be recalcitrant in sewer treatment facilities and in the environment. Carbamazepine concentrations were monitored throughout a 1.2 ha constructed wetland. Concentrations were linked to the hydraulics of the wetland and retention time.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page