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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHEMICAL SIGNALS FOR MANAGING INSECTS Title: A new classification system for the actions of IRS chemicals traditionally used for malaria control

Authors
item Greico, John - USHUS
item Achee, Nicole - USHUS
item Chareonviryaphap, Theeraphap - UKASETSART
item Suwonakerd, Wannapa - UKASETSART
item CHAUHAN, KAMAL
item Sardelis, Mike - USUHS
item Roberts, Donald - USHUS

Submitted to: PLoS One
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 20, 2007
Publication Date: August 8, 2007
Repository URL: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0000716
Citation: Grieco, J.P., Achee, N.L., Chareonviriyaphap, T., Suwonkerd, W., Chauhan, K.R., Sardelis, M., Roberts, D. 2007. A new classification system for the actions of IRS chemicals traditionally used for malaria control. PLoS ONE 2(8):e716.

Interpretive Summary: Knowledge of how mosquitoes respond to insecticides is of paramount importance in understanding how an insecticide functions to prevent disease transmission. A suite of laboratory assays were used to quantitatively characterize mosquito responses. Based on combination of laboratory and confirmatory field data, we are proposing a new paradigm for classifying chemicals used for vector control according to how the chemicals actually function to prevent disease transmission inside houses. This new classification will be useful as valuable tool in designing preventive measures against disease vectors in epidemic areas.

Technical Abstract: Knowledge of how mosquitoes respond to insecticides is of paramount importance in understanding how an insecticide functions to prevent disease transmission. A suite of laboratory assays was used to quantitatively characterize mosquito responses to toxic, contact irritant, and no contact spatial repellent actions of standard insecticides. Highly replicated tests of these compounds over a range of concentrations proved that all were toxic; some were contact irritants, and even fewer were non-contact repellents. Based on combination of laboratory and confirmatory field data, we are proposing a new paradigm for classifying chemicals used for vector control according to how the chemicals actually function to prevent disease transmission inside houses.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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