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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DELTA OBESITY PREVENTION RESEARCH PROGRAM

Location: Delta Obesity Prevention Research Unit

Title: The Role of Community Walking Programs to Improve Health, and Prevent Obesity, in Rural, High Risk, Minority Populations

Authors
item Weber, Judith - DELTA NIRI
item Yadrick, Kathy - DELTA NIRI
item Zoellner, Jamie - DELTA NIRI
item Champagne, Catherine - DELTA NIRI
item Bradley, Bonnie - DELTA NIRI
item Sims, Dianne - MARVELL NIRI
item McCabe Sellers, Beverly
item Bogle, Margaret

Submitted to: International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 10, 2006
Publication Date: June 20, 2007
Citation: Weber, J.M., Yadrick, K., Zoellner, J., Champagne, C., Bradley, B., Sims, D., Mccabe Sellers, B.J., Bogle, M.L. 2007. The role of community walking programs to improve health, and prevent obesity, in rural, high risk, minority populations. Proceedings of International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. P. 119.

Technical Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of community walking programs to improve health (e.g., reduce blood pressure, improve lipid profile) and prevent obesity (e.g., maintain or reduce BMI and body fat) in rural, high risk, minority populations. Original data will be presented from at least two rural communities in two states in the U.S. Rationale: Physical inactivity has been linked to cardiovascular disease risk, hypertension, obesity, and type II diabetes. In the U.S., 25% of adults engage in no leisure-time physical activity, and women are less active than men. Populations with lower incomes and less education, African Americans and Hispanics, all engage in less physical activity than the general U.S. population. Walking is accessible and low cost, and is the most common physical activity among the general population, and in major subpopulations such as the elderly and racial minorities, which makes it an important focus for health improvement programs. Objectives: 1. To evaluate and discuss the physiologic outcome and process evaluation data from at least two sample programs to determine future directions; 2. To discuss barriers and facilitators of desired behaviors and their impact on future walking program interventions; and 3. To discuss the challenges and successes to using the Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) method for developing, implementing, and evaluating community walking programs for health promotion and obesity prevention. Summary: 1. Overview of the problem, description of the high risk population, and an explanation of why walking programs are especially appropriate for this population; 2. Presentation of the Marvell NIRI Walking Club Research Intervention, a 12-month walking program conducted in rural Arkansas using the CBPR method; original data will be presented; 3. Presentation of the Fit for Life Research Intervention, a 6-month walking program conducted in rural Mississippi using the CBPR method; original data will be presented; 4. Presentation of the process evaluation component of Fit for Life; original data will be presented; (or another walking program from another state; in that case, the process evaluation will be included in #3); 5. Overview of the CBPR research method, and the advantages and challenges to using this method to develop effective behavioral physical activity and nutrition interventions in rural communities. A discussion of barriers and facilitators of desired behaviors will be included in this discussion. Format: 1. Overview and Marvell NIRI: ACHRI 2. Fit for Life and Process Evaluation: USM and ASU 3. Overview of CBPR: UAPB and USDA

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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