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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL AND PROTECTION TOOLS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF MOSQUITOES AND FILTH FLIES

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Influence of multiple blood meals on gonotrophic dissociation and fecundity in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)

Author
item Barnard, Donald

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 18, 2006
Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Citation: Barnard, D.R. 2006. Influence of multiple blood meals on gonotrophic dissociation and fecundity in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae). Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Female Aedes albopictus mosquitoes fed on Guinea pigs (82 eggs/female) and humans (82 eggs/female) produced significantly (p<0.05) more eggs than mosquitoes fed on chickens (67 eggs/female). Fecundity in mosquitoes with two blood meals from two different host types (chicken and Guinea pig), three blood meals from the same host type (Guinea pig), or three blood meals from three different host types (human, Guinea pig, and chicken) was significantly (p<0.01) higher than in mosquitoes that acquired the blood meal from a single chicken host or from two different chicken hosts. Neither blood meal source nor the number of blood meals acquired from different host types affected the rate of gonotrophic dissociation.

Technical Abstract: Female Aedes albopictus mosquitoes fed on Guinea pigs (82 eggs/female) and humans (82 eggs/female) produced significantly (p<0.05) more eggs than mosquitoes fed on chickens (67 eggs/female). Fecundity in mosquitoes with two blood meals from two different host types (chicken and Guinea pig), three blood meals from the same host type (Guinea pig), or three blood meals from three different host types (human, Guinea pig, and chicken) was significantly (p<0.01) higher than in mosquitoes that acquired the blood meal from a single chicken host or from two different chicken hosts. Neither blood meal source nor the number of blood meals acquired from different host types affected the rate of gonotrophic dissociation.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014