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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS OF RENEWABLE FUELS DERIVED FROM GRAINS AND RELATED BIOMASS Title: Fast pyrolysis and bio-oil production from energy crops being developed within USDA's Agricultural Research Service

Author
item Boateng, Akwasi

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 20, 2006
Publication Date: November 22, 2006
Citation: Boateng, A.A. 2006. Fast pyrolysis and bio-oil production from energy crops being developed within USDA's Agricultural Research Service. Meeting Abstract, at the 223rd ACS National Meeting, March 25-29, 2007, Chicago, IL.

Technical Abstract: The US DOE-USDA biomass initiative vision is counting on lignocellulosic conversion to boost the quantities of biofuels currently produced from starches in order to achieve much needed energy security. However, with the current challenges in the lignocellulosic conversion to ethanol via the sugar technologies, other methods including thermochemical conversion of biomass to useable energy carrier forms may provide nearer term solution and are receiving attention nationally. One such technique, fast pyrolysis, a rapid thermal decomposition of organic compounds in the absence of oxygen to produce liquids, char and gas, is being considered by ARS researchers for energy crops conversion. Pyrolysis of energy crops including alfalfa stems, cool and warm-seasoned perennial grasses such as reed canary grass, eastern gamma grass, bermudagrass and switchgrass being developed at ARS has been studied. Effect of maturity at harvest and, in some cases, genotype have been characterized and will be presented. Fluidized-bed pyrolysis process for the production of bio-oil from Cave-in-Rock switchgrass cultivar including material and energy balances will be discussed. The potential for the use of the pyrolysis oil as a diesel grade fuel for stationary power applications and its upgrading into transportation fuels will also be discussed.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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