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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of prescribed burning and herbicides on Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis)

Authors
item Lund, Corie - ND STATE UNIV, FARGO ND
item Hendrickson, John
item Kirby, Donald - ND STATE UNIV, FARGO ND

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 5, 2006
Publication Date: February 9, 2009
Citation: Lund, C., Hendrickson, J.R., Kirby, D. 2009. Effect of prescribed burning and herbicides on Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts.

Technical Abstract: The Sheyenne National Grassland, in southeastern North Dakota, is being threatened by invading plant species including Kentucky bluegrass. The objective of this study, initiated in 2006, was to evaluate the effect of prescribed burning in combination with herbicide treatments for the control of Kentucky bluegrass. Three sites were selected with each having a different level of Kentucky bluegrass infestation; low (35%), moderate (60%) and high (80%). Within these sites, six treatments were applied to 10 x 20 m plots in a split plot design with burn being the main plot and the herbicide being the subplots. Treatments were: 1) fall burn with no herbicide treatment, 2) fall burn with spring applied glyphosate, 3) fall burn with spring applied imazapic, 4) spring burn with no herbicide treatment, 5) spring burn with fall applied glyphosate, and 6) spring burn with fall applied imazapic. Herbaceous basal cover was evaluated using 10-point frames. One year post-burn, the burn only treatment had no effect on Kentucky bluegrass or native grasses except on the low Kentucky bluegrass site where the spring burn increased native species composition. Imazapic application following a fall fire decreased Kentucky bluegrass and increased native grass composition on the low Kentucky bluegrass site compared to fire alone. Glyphosate application combined with prescribed fire decreased Kentucky bluegrass and increased native grass composition on the low Kentucky bluegrass site with the fall burn, the moderate site with the spring and fall burns, and the high Kentucky bluegrass site with the fall burn compared to fire alone.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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