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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY OF MORONE SPECIES CULTURE Title: Effect of tank stocking density on larval sunshine bass growth and survival to the fingerling stage

Authors
item Ludwig, Gerald
item Lochmann, Steve - UAPB

Submitted to: North American Journal of Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2007
Publication Date: October 1, 2007
Citation: Ludwig, G.M., Lochmann, S. 2007. Effect of tank stocking density on larval sunshine bass growth and survival to the fingerling stage. North American Journal of Aquaculture. 69:407-412.

Interpretive Summary: Determining the optimum parameters for tank culture of sunshine bass fingerlings will facilitate a year-round supply of seed for the production cycle of this increasingly popular food fish. This experiment determined the relationship between the stocking density of sunshine bass larvae in tanks and their survival rate and size at the time they were trained to accept commercial feeds. Four-day post-hatch (dph) larvae were stocked at 10 densities from 30 to 120 larvae/L at 10 larvae/L increments. The larvae were initially fed rotifers cultured with Nannochloropsis sp. algae paste and commercial rotifer feed until 10 dph. Conversion to Artemia began at 7 dph and training to dry starter feed began at 20 dph. Photographs of live samples of larvae taken at 4 dph and harvest were used to determine length of the fish. Regression analysis determined no significant relationship between survival and stocking density. Length and weight of the fish had a linear, negative relationship with stocking density, while total tank yield had a curvilinear relationship with stocking density. The stocking density that provided maximum yield was 87 larvae/L.

Technical Abstract: Determining the optimum parameters for tank culture of sunshine bass fingerlings will facilitate a year-round supply of seed for the production cycle of this increasingly popular food fish. This experiment determined the relationship between the stocking density of sunshine bass larvae in tanks and their survival rate and size at the time they were trained to accept commercial feeds. Four-day post-hatch (dph) larvae were stocked at 10 densities from 30 to 120 larvae/L at 10 larvae/L increments. The larvae were initially fed rotifers cultured with Nannochloropsis sp. algae paste and commercial rotifer feed until 10 dph. Conversion to Artemia began at 7 dph and training to dry starter feed began at 20 dph. Photographs of live samples of larvae taken at 4 dph and harvest were used to determine length of the fish. Regression analysis determined no significant relationship between survival and stocking density. Length and weight of the fish had a linear, negative relationship with stocking density, while total tank yield had a curvilinear relationship with stocking density. The stocking density that provided maximum yield was 87 larvae/L.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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