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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PEST BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE Title: Resistance to Aphis glycines (Homoptera: Aphididae) in Various Soybean Lines under Controlled Laboratory Conditions

Authors
item Hesler, Louis
item Dashiell, Kenton

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2007
Publication Date: August 1, 2007
Citation: Hesler, L.S., Dashiell, K.E. 2007. Resistance to Aphis glycines (Homoptera: Aphididae) in Various Soybean Lines under Controlled Laboratory Conditions. Journal of Economic Entomology. 100:1464-1469.

Interpretive Summary: The soybean aphid (SBA) is a soybean pest native to Asia, and it has recently become a principal pest of soybeans in many areas of the United States and Canada. Current management practices rely on insecticides, and host-plant resistance is a potential, alternative management tool for SBA. Growth-chamber tests were conducted to determine and characterize resistance among lines of soybean to SBA. Screening tests showed that all plants of lines Cobb, Tie-feng 8, and Jackson were resistant to SBA-population growth. Braxton had an intermediate proportion of resistant plants that did not differ from that of either resistant or susceptible accessions. Follow-up experiments showed that antixenosis, or non-preference, was a modality of resistance to SBA in Jackson and Cobb based on reduced nymphiposition in no-choice tests and fewer numbers of aphids on plants over 48 h compared to numbers on 91B91. Antibiosis to SBA was evident in Jackson, Cobb and Tie-feng 8 from a diminished proportion of aphids that reproduced compared to 91B91, and in Jackson, Cobb, Tie-feng 8 and Braxton by fewer progeny produced on these accessions than on 91B91. Days for SBA to mature did not differ among accessions. Our results confirm earlier findings that Jackson is a strong source of resistance to SBA, and also suggest that accessions Cobb and Tie-feng 8 are potentially useful sources of resistance to SBA for soybean breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is a soybean pest native to Asia, and it has recently become a principal pest of soybeans in many areas of the United States and Canada. Current management practices rely on insecticides, and host-plant resistance is a potential, alternative management tool for A. glycines. Growth-chamber tests were conducted to determine and characterize resistance among accessions of soybean to A. glycines. Screening tests showed that all plants of accessions Cobb, Tie-feng 8, and Jackson were resistant to A. glycines-population growth. Braxton had an intermediate proportion of resistant plants that did not differ from that of either resistant or susceptible accessions. Follow-up experiments showed that antixenosis was a modality of resistance to A. glycines in Jackson and Cobb based on reduced nymphiposition in no-choice tests and fewer numbers of aphids on plants over 48 h compared to numbers on 91B91. Antibiosis to A. glycines was evident in Jackson, Cobb and Tie-feng 8 from a diminished proportion of aphids that reproduced compared to 91B91, and in Jackson, Cobb, Tie-feng 8 and Braxton by fewer progeny produced on these accessions than on 91B91. Days for A. glycines to mature did not differ among accessions. Our results confirm earlier findings that Jackson is a strong source of resistance to A. glycines, and also suggest that accessions Cobb and Tie-feng 8 are potentially useful sources of resistance to A. glycines for soybean breeding programs.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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