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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Stimulation of Muscle Protein Synthesis by Glucose in Neonates Is Amp Kinase Independent

Authors
item Jeyapalan, Asumpthia - BAYLOR COLL OF MEDICINE
item Orellana, Renan - BAYLOR COLL OF MEDICINE
item Suryawan, Agus
item Nguyen, Hanh - BAYLOR COLL OF MEDICINE
item Escobar, Jeffery - BAYLOR COLL OF MEDICINE
item Frank, Jason - BAYLOR COLL OF MEDICINE
item DAVIS, TERESA

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 7, 2006
Publication Date: April 1, 2006
Citation: Jeyapalan, A.S. Orellana, R.A., Suryawan, A., Nguyen, H.V., Escobar, J., Frank, J., Davis, T.A. 2006. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by glucose in neonates is AMP kinase independent [abstract]. The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference: Advancing the Biomedical Frontier, April 1-5, 2006, San Francisco, California. 20(5):Part II, p. A1046.

Technical Abstract: Muscle protein synthesis is elevated in the neonate, in part due to an elevated response to the rise in amino acids and insulin after a meal. Recent evidence suggests that glucose may also play a role in the regulation of protein synthesis. AMP kinase has been recognized as an energy sensor and a regulator of protein synthesis. To determine whether the postprandial rise in glucose plays a role in the regulation of muscle protein synthesis in the neonate and whether this is modulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we performed pancreatic substrate clamps in fasted 5- to 6-day-old pigs. Pigs (n = 4-5/group) were infused with somatostatin to block insulin secretion, glucose to achieve fasting or fed levels, insulin to achieve fasting or fed levels, while amino acids were maintained at either fasting or fed levels. Raising glucose alone to fed levels increased muscle protein synthesis by 42%. Raising glucose, amino acids, and insulin to fed levels increased muscle protein synthesis by 64%. AMPK activation did not change with any treatment. This suggests that glucose increases muscle protein synthesis in the neonate through an AMPK-independent mechanism.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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