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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Blastomycetes

Author
item Dugan, Frank

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 13, 2006
Publication Date: July 24, 2007
Citation: Dugan, F.M. 2007. Blastomycetes. In: In: McGraw-Hill Book Company editor. McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, 10th edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. p. 154-155.

Interpretive Summary: Blastomycetes is a term used for yeasts that propagate asexually by splitting or budding. Although the term is increasingly obsolete (it is not used as a taxonomic group by contemporary taxonomists) it sometimes persists as an informal term of convenience and is frequently encountered in older literature. Two older systems of classification are noted: Cryptococcales (for ascomycetous yeasts) plus Sporobolomycetales (for basidiomycetous yeasts); and the alternative scheme of Saccharomycetes (for ascomycetous yeasts) plus Holobasidiomycetes and Teliomycetes (both of which are basidiomycetes, and include additional members other than those forming yeast states). In contemporary practice, yeasts producing asexually do not receive classification separate from other yeasts.

Technical Abstract: Blastomycetes is a term used for yeasts that propagate asexually by splitting or budding. Although the term is increasingly obsolete (it is not used as a taxonomic group by contemporary taxonomists) it sometimes persists as an informal term of convenience and is frequently encountered in older literature. Two older systems of classification are noted: Cryptococcales (for ascomycetous yeasts) plus Sporobolomycetales (for basidiomycetous yeasts); and the alternative scheme of Saccharomycetes (for ascomycetous yeasts) plus Holobasidiomycetes and Teliomycetes (both of which are basidiomycetes, and include additional members other than those forming yeast states). In contemporary practice, yeasts producing asexually do not receive classification separate from other yeasts.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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