Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Herbicide Drift Studies at Uapb: New Paradigms Based on Natural Communities

Authors
item Perschbacher, P - UAPB
item Edziyie, R - UAPB
item Ludwig, Gerald

Submitted to: The 1890 Association of Research Directors Biennial Research Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2006
Publication Date: March 24, 2006
Citation: Perschbacher, P.W., Edziyie, R., Ludwig, G.M. 2006. Herbicide drift studies at UAPB: New paradigms based on natural communities [abstract]. The 1890 Association of Research Directors 14th Biennial Research Symposium. p. 8.

Interpretive Summary: Aquatic ecosystems produce substantial aquatic products, including all-new sources of seafood, from aquaculture. Aquaculture ponds are susceptible to impacts from crop production through drift of herbicides. To assess these impacts field research in replicated mesocosms filled with samples of various natural pond ecosystems and communities and subjected them to expected levels of drift from all major herbicides currently in use. Ten years of research has led to a reevaluation of current thinking on environmental impacts. Rather than testing toxicity on individual animals, community-level approaches give a better approximate of ecosystem impact. Herbicides that impact phytoplankton will impact the ecosystem by reducing oxygen production, reducing of ammonia and nitrite uptake, and reducing fish and zooplankton food, etc. Of 34 aerially-applied herbicides tested at up to 100% application rates and by 10 parameters , only propanil, used for rice, diuron, used on cotton, and atrazine used on corn significantly affected ecosystem functioning. Each of these caused some short-term changes in ponds that would most likely have little effect on fish production if pond aeration were applied.

Technical Abstract: Aquatic ecosystems produce substantial aquatic products, including all-new sources of seafood, from aquaculture. Aquaculture ponds are susceptible to impacts from crop production through drift of herbicides. To assess these impacts field research in replicated mesocosms filled with samples of various natural pond ecosystems and communities and subjected them to expected levels of drift from all major herbicides currently in use. Ten years of research has led to a reevaluation of current thinking on environmental impacts. Rather than testing toxicity on individual animals, community-level approaches give a better approximate of ecosystem impact. Herbicides that impact phytoplankton will impact the ecosystem by reducing oxygen production, reducing of ammonia and nitrite uptake, and reducing fish and zooplankton food, etc. Of 34 aerially-applied herbicides tested at up to 100% application rates and by 10 parameters , only propanil, used for rice, diuron, used on cotton, and atrazine used on corn significantly affected ecosystem functioning. Each of these caused some short-term changes in ponds that would most likely have little effect on fish production if pond aeration were applied.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page