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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICALLY-BASED PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR WESTERN COTTON

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Progress toward quantifying landscape-scale movement patterns of the glassy-winged sharpshooter and its natural enemies using a novel marl-capture technique

Authors
item Hagler, James
item Blackmer, Jacquelyn
item Henneberry, Thomas
item Daane, Kent - UC BERKELEY, CA
item Groves, Russell
item Jones, Vince - WSU, WENATCHEE, WA

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 5, 2005
Publication Date: January 1, 2006
Citation: Hagler, J.R., Blackmer, J.L., Henneberry, T.J., Daane, K., Groves, R.L., Jones, V. 2006. Progress toward quantifying landscape-scale movement patterns of the glassy-winged sharpshooter and it's natural enemies using a movel mark-capture technique. CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium 109-112.

Interpretive Summary: Here we present the results of the first year of our research targeted at quantifying the landscape-level movement patterns of GWSS and its natural enemies. We showed that protein markers can be rapidly acquired and retained on insects for several weeks after marking directly in the field. Specifically, we sprayed a large citrus plot and a large olive tree plot with different inexpensive proteins using conventional air blast sprayer. In turn, insects that were hit by the protein solutions or that were exposed to marked plant tissue obtained enough protein to be detected by a protein-specific ELISA. Because the various protein specific ELlSA do not cross-react, we can apply the various proteins to different host plants in close proximity to one another. This marking technique provides the necessary tool to distinguish GWSS and its natural enemies so that studies of dispersal, migration, longevity, and density can be conducted. Additionally, different protein markers can be used to identify insect movement from different areas within a crop or from different crops.

Technical Abstract: Here we present the results of the first year of our research targeted at quantifying the landscape-level movement patterns of GWSS and its natural enemies. We showed that protein markers can be rapidly acquired and retained on insects for several weeks after marking directly in the field. Specifically, we sprayed a large citrus plot and a large olive tree plot with different inexpensive proteins using conventional air blast sprayer. In turn, insects that were hit by the protein solutions or that were exposed to marked plant tissue obtained enough protein to be detected by a protein-specific ELISA. Because the various protein specific ELlSA do not cross-react, we can apply the various proteins to different host plants in close proximity to one another. This marking technique provides the necessary tool to distinguish GWSS and its natural enemies so that studies of dispersal, migration, longevity, and density can be conducted. Additionally, different protein markers can be used to identify insect movement from different areas within a crop or from different crops.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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