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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Use of Stir-Bar Sorptive Extraction (Sbse) for Analytical Food Analysis

Authors
item Goodner, Kevin
item Bai, Jinhe - OREGON STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 6, 2006
Publication Date: April 11, 2007
Citation: Goodner, K.L., Bai, J. 2006. The use of stir-bar sorptive extraction (sbse) for analytical food analysis. Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society. 119:379-382.

Interpretive Summary: Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) is a relatively new technique which employs an adsorptive coating on a magnetic stir bar. Three experiments were conducted to explore aspects of using SBSE for food analysis. First is a basic examination of calibration curves using SBSE. The best results were obtained by using many stir bars to analyze all calibration points at once. Second, the viability of using SBSE to simplify long distance collaboration was examined by exposing six stir bars to pineapple juice and analyzing three immediately and then another three 24 hours later to simulate over night shipping of the stir bars. Qualitatively, the chromatograms were identical, and quantitatively, only 2 of the twenty peaks examined were statistically significantly different to a large degree. Lastly, the possibility of inserting the stir bars inside of immature fruit, allowing the fruit to grow around the stir bar, extracting the stir bar, and determining fruit maturity markers was examined. This sampling method was found to be not practical due to the weak signal observed resulting in only one potential maturity marker.

Technical Abstract: Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) is a relatively new technique which employs an adsorptive coating on a magnetic stir bar. The technique is similar to solid phase microextraction (SPME) in theory, but in practice is considerably different due to the difference in physical design. Three experiments were conducted to explore aspects of using SBSE for food analysis. The first was a basic examination of calibration curves using SBSE versus SPME. The best results were obtained by using many stir bars to analyze all calibration points at once. Second, the viability of using SBSE to simplify long distance collaboration was examined by exposing six SBSEs to pineapple juice and analyzing three immediately and then another three 24 hours later to simulate over night shipping of the stir bars. Qualitatively, the chromatograms were identical, and quantitatively, only 2 of the twenty peaks examined were statistically significantly different to a large degree. Lastly, the possibility of inserting the stir bars inside of immature fruit, allowing the fruit to grow around the stir bar, extracting the stir bar, and determining fruit maturity markers was examined. This sampling method was found to be not practical due to the lack of mobility of compounds inside fruit and the resulting chromatogram intensities were too weak for normal analysis with only methyl tridecanoate exhibiting any correlation with ripening (r=-0.8 for both Barlett and D’Anjou varieties).

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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