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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT & EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS FOR INVASIVE SPECIES THREATENING THE EVERGLADES & OTHER NATURAL AND MANANGED SYSTEMS

Location: Invasive Plant Research Laboratory

Title: Geographic range expansion of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (hemiptera: psyllidae), to Puerto Rico

Authors
item Pratt, Paul
item Rayamajhi, Min
item L., Bernier - DRNA/PUERTO RICO
item Center, Ted

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 16, 2006
Publication Date: December 15, 2006
Citation: Pratt, P.D., Rayamajhi, M.B., Bernier,L., Center, T.D. 2006. Geographic range expansion of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (hemiptera: psyllidae), to Puerto Rico. Florida Entomologist. 89(4):529-531.

Interpretive Summary: The Australian tree Melaleuca quinquenervia has been planted throughout much of the Caribbean. In Puerto Rico, for instance, it was planted island-wide in public parks, promenades and along certain highway medians and green areas from the 1970-90s. Not surprisingly, the extensive use of M. quinquenervia as an ornamental in Puerto Rico enabled it to naturalize in ecologically sensitive wetlands, including the Tortuguero Lagoon Natural Reserve. The melaleuca psyllid, Boreioglycaspis melaleucae, was recently discovered on leaves of M. quinquenervia trees growing near the San Juan Airport, Puerto Rico. A survey of the island was conducted in April 2006 to determine the geographic distribution of B. melaleucae on the island. The psyllid is widely distributed on the island except the western coast. It is unlikely to harm native plant species but will become a pest of ornamental landscape plantings of M. quinquenervia.

Technical Abstract: The Australian tree Melaleuca quinquenervia has been planted throughout much of the Caribbean. In Puerto Rico, for instance, it was planted island-wide in public parks, promenades and along certain highway medians and green areas from the 1970-90s. Not surprisingly, the extensive use of M. quinquenervia as an ornamental in Puerto Rico enabled it to naturalize in ecologically sensitive wetlands, including the Tortuguero Lagoon Natural Reserve. The melaleuca psyllid, Boreioglycaspis melaleucae, was recently discovered on leaves of M. quinquenervia trees growing near the San Juan Airport, Puerto Rico. A survey of the island was conducted in April 2006 to determine the geographic distribution of B. melaleucae on the island. The psyllid is widely distributed on the island except the western coast. It is unlikely to harm native plant species but will become a pest of ornamental landscape plantings of M. quinquenervia.

Last Modified: 8/2/2014
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