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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Final Report to Foreign Agricultural Service: Solutions to Food Safety and Security for Mexico and the United States - Development of Nonantibiotic Alternatives for Foodborne Pathogens Control in Poultry

Authors
item Donoghue, Dan - UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
item Tellez, G - UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
item Hargis, Billy - UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
item DONOGHUE, ANN

Submitted to: Government Publication/Report
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2006
Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Citation: Donoghue, D.J., Tellez, G., Hargis, B.M., Donoghue, A.M. 2006. Final Report to Foreign Agricultural Service: Solutions to food safety and security for Mexico and the United States - development of nonantibiotic alternatives for foodborne pathogens control in poultry. Foreign Agricultural Service. 28 p.

Interpretive Summary: Salmonella (non-typhoid) continues to be a predominate food-borne pathogen worldwide, and poultry and poultry products are a prevailing vehicle for salmonellosis. The research developed under this proposal brought together experts from the United States and Mexico to combat this problem using two unique approaches: the use of a novel competitive exclusion method and the use of bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella in poultry. The first method, competitive exclusion, relies on the administration of nonpathogenic bacteria to neonatal chicks to accelerate maturation of beneficial intestinal microflora. Simply stated, “good bacteria”, may exclude or out-compete “bad bacteria” (e. g., Salmonella). While this strategy has been shown to have tremendous potential, existing competitive exclusion products are either expensive, difficult to administer, lack consistent efficacy or may harbor unknown pathogens. The project utilized a novel approach through a systematic means of selecting individual bacteria capable of excluding or eliminating Salmonella. Results from our laboratories indicated that it is possible to preselect intestinal bacteria for prophylactic efficacy against Salmonella and that these bacteria may allow development of an inexpensive, safe and efficacious culture capable of reducing or preventing this pathogen during poultry production. We evaluated over 8 million bacterial isolates to determine efficacy against Salmonella. Additionally, bacteriophages (viruses that infect and kill only bacteria, with no potential to harm animals or plants) were isolated with efficacy against Salmonella. Specific bacteriophage therapy has been reported in numerous research studies to be potentially efficacious as an alternative to the use of antimicrobial drugs for the control of enteric disease in animals and man. We isolated bacteriophage for Salmonella spp. from a variety of environmental sources and have demonstrated their efficacy in vitro. This project generated >30 publications in the US and Mexico, enhanced collaboration between these countries and resulted in a competitive exclusion product now used in Mexico and the US. Because of the increasing concerns about antibiotic resistance, we believe these are important alternatives for combating Salmonella in both Mexico and the US. Furthermore, we believe that successful control of these (and other) disease-causing agents will reduce agricultural trade barriers between the US and our important trade partners in Mexico.

Technical Abstract: Salmonella (non-typhoid) continues to be a predominate food-borne pathogen worldwide, and poultry and poultry products are a prevailing vehicle for salmonellosis. The research developed under this proposal brought together experts from the United States and Mexico to combat this problem using two unique approaches: the use of a novel competitive exclusion method and the use of bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella in poultry. The first method, competitive exclusion, relies on the administration of nonpathogenic bacteria to neonatal chicks to accelerate maturation of beneficial intestinal microflora. Simply stated, “good bacteria”, may exclude or out-compete “bad bacteria” (e. g., Salmonella). While this strategy has been shown to have tremendous potential, existing competitive exclusion products are either expensive, difficult to administer, lack consistent efficacy or may harbor unknown pathogens. The project utilized a novel approach through a systematic means of selecting individual bacteria capable of excluding or eliminating Salmonella. Results from our laboratories indicated that it is possible to preselect intestinal bacteria for prophylactic efficacy against Salmonella and that these bacteria may allow development of an inexpensive, safe and efficacious culture capable of reducing or preventing this pathogen during poultry production. We evaluated over 8 million bacterial isolates to determine efficacy against Salmonella. Additionally, bacteriophages (viruses that infect and kill only bacteria, with no potential to harm animals or plants) were isolated with efficacy against Salmonella. Specific bacteriophage therapy has been reported in numerous research studies to be potentially efficacious as an alternative to the use of antimicrobial drugs for the control of enteric disease in animals and man. We isolated bacteriophage for Salmonella spp. from a variety of environmental sources and have demonstrated their efficacy in vitro. This project generated >30 publications in the US and Mexico, enhanced collaboration between these countries and resulted in a competitive exclusion product now used in Mexico and the US. Because of the increasing concerns about antibiotic resistance, we believe these are important alternatives for combating Salmonella in both Mexico and the US. Furthermore, we believe that successful control of these (and other) disease-causing agents will reduce agricultural trade barriers between the US and our important trade partners in Mexico.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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