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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Blood Pressure Is Improved in Rural Mississippi Residents by a Community-Based Nutrition and Physical Activity Intervention

Authors
item Fungwe, Thomas - ALCORN STATE UNIVERSITY
item Santell, Ross - ALCORN STATE UNIVERSITY
item Zoellner, Jamie - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
item Connell, Carol - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
item Lucas, Gwen - ALCORN STATE UNIVERSITY
item Strickland, Earline - ARS CONSULTANT
item Yadrick, Kathy - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
item Avis, Amanda - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
item Lofton, Kristi - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
item Rowser, Marjuyua - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 19, 2006
Publication Date: April 13, 2006
Citation: Fungwe, T., Santell, R., Zoellner, J., Connell, C., Lucas, G., Strickland, E., Yadrick, K., Avis, A., Lofton, K., Rowser, M. 2006. Blood pressure is improved in rural Mississippi residents by a community-based nutrition and physical activity intervention [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 3(LB):98.

Technical Abstract: Obesity requires non-traditional approaches to address its causes. One goal of the Fit For Life Steps program is to develop interventions, using Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), to reduce obesity and its co-morbidities. University partners provided the research framework for the intervention as eight community coaches were recruited and led 83 community members in walking groups. Anthropometric and biological data were collected at enrollment, 3 months, and 6 months. Results from 3-months data collection: mean body wt and BMI did not change significantly (p = 0.456, 0.534); significant decline in systolic (138 to 128 mmHg, p<0.001) and in diastolic (88 to 85 mmHg, p=0.01) blood pressure; total cholesterol (p=0.039) and triglyceride (p=0.013) increased; LDL (p=0.482) and HDL (p=0.128) did not change, although 52% of the participants had small increases in HDL. Except for TG and LDL, most participants (50-80%) experienced some decline in one or more parameters measured. Blood pressure reductions realized in this study suggest a CBPR approach to improving health is effective in lowering blood pressure.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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