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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: 59th Annual Conference Report on Cotton Insect Research and Control

Authors
item Adamczyk, John
item Lorenz, Gus - UNIV. OF ARKANSAS

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2006
Publication Date: July 1, 2006
Citation: Adamczyk Jr, J.J., Lorenz, G. 2006. 59th annual conference report on cotton insect research and control. National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference.

Interpretive Summary: This paper provides an overview of cotton losses attributed to insect damage that occurred during the cotton growing season in 2005. In 2005, there were 13,938,000 acres of U.S. cotton (Upland and Pima) harvested with an average of 839 pounds of cotton per acre. Insect pests of cotton reduced yield by 4.5% in 2005. Caterpillars were the predominate pest and reduced yields by 1.50%. Direct insect management costs amounted to $56.62 per acre. Because of insects, cost plus loss is estimated at $1.256 billion.

Technical Abstract: This paper provides an overview of cotton losses attributed to insect damage that occurred during the cotton growing season in 2005. In addition, overviews of research conducted on insect pests of cotton are also included. It is primarily comprised of state reports from extension and university personnel. In 2005, there were 13,938,000 acres of U.S. cotton (Upland and Pima) harvested with an average of 839 pounds of lint per acre (USDA –January 2006 report) in 2005. Arthropod pests of cotton reduced yield by 4.47% in 2005. The bollworm/budworm complex reduced yields by 1.50%. The bollworm was the predominant species to attack cotton in 2005. Bollworms were estimated to make up 95% of the population Lygus (0.9%) were 2nd in losses. Stink bugs (0.64%) were 3rd and Thrips (0.43%) were 4th. Spider mites (0.35%) rounded out the top five cotton arthropod pests for the year. Beltwide, direct insect management costs amounted to $56.62 acre. Cost plus loss is estimated at $1.256 billion.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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