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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BENEFITS AND RISKS OF USING WASTE FOUNDRY SAND FOR AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL APPLICATIONS Title: The Community Composition of Root-Associated Bacteria of the Tomato Plant

Authors
item Kim, Jong-Shik - UNIV OF CALIF, RIVERSIDE
item Dungan, Robert
item Kwon, Soon-Wo - KACC, SUWON, KOREA
item Weon, Hang-Yeon - NIAST, SUWON, KOREA

Submitted to: World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 24, 2006
Publication Date: December 1, 2006
Citation: Kim, J., Dungan, R.S., Kwon, S., Weon, H. 2006. The community composition of root-associated bacteria of the tomato plant. World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. Vol. 22, pp. 1267-1273.

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this study was to characterize the bacterial community composition in the bulk soil, rhizoplane and root tissue of the tomato plant (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill). 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from the bacterial community was amplified using PCR, and sequence analysis of 16S rDNA clones was subsequently used for bacterial identification and phylogenetic classification. Phylogenetic analysis of clones (total of 68) from the rhizosphere and root tissues showed that about 50% of the bacteria belonged to the '-, '-, '-, and '-Proteobacteria or Cytophyga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) phyla, with only one high G+C clone identified. A number of diverse bacteria were identified within Proteobacteria, while 87% of the bacteria belonged to the genus Flavobacterium within the CFB phylum, which is a unique finding for tomato plants. Our results will be of interest to those wanting to identify bacteria that can promote plant growth or resistance to plant diseases.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the composition of the bacterial community in the root-zone soil and root tissue of the tomato plant. Genomic DNA from the bacterial community was isolated, replicated and analyzed to identify the bacteria. The majority of the bacteria were identified as being Gram-negative and belonging to the phyla known as Proteobacteria and Cytophyga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB). 87% of the bacteria within the CFB phylum belonged to the genus Flavobacterium, which is a unique finding for tomato plants. Our results will be of interest to those wanting to identify bacteria that can promote plant growth or resistance to plant diseases.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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