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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Comparative Genome Analysis of Recently Domesticated Turfgrasses (Agrostis and Lolium)

Authors
item Jung, Geunhwa - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Chakraborty, Nanda - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Bae, Jin-Joo - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Sim, Sung-Chur - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Curley, Joe - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Barker, Reed
item Warnke, Scott

Submitted to: Plant and Animal Genome VX Conference Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 31, 2004
Publication Date: January 31, 2005
Citation: Jung, G., Chakraborty, N., Bae, J., Sim, S., Curley, J., Barker, R.E., Warnke, S.E. 2005. Comparative genome analysis of recently domesticated turfgrasses (agrostis and lolium). Plant and Animal Genome Abstracts. Abstract #W191. Available: http://www.intl-pag.org/13/abstracts/PAG13_W191.html

Interpretive Summary: Creeping bentgrass and perennial ryegrass are important cool season turf and forage grasses used worldwide. These are self-incompatible and highly heterozygous outbreeders. Because these species are more recently domesticated through selection from naturalized populations, from intra- and inter-specific hybridizations, and through selection pressures (grazing, mowing, and forage nutrition, property, and color), they are very different from cereal crops that have a long history of cultivation. Genomic research on these species is very important to deepen and broaden knowledge of turf and forage grass genomes. Dense genetic linkage maps were constructed to compare the genomes of these two species with other Poaceae species. Comparative genome analysis via number and pattern of chromosomal rearrangements do not support traditional morphological trait analysis based affinity relationships among Agrostis, Lolium, Triticeae, and Avena in the same subfamily Pooideae of the grass family Poaceae. No evidence of chromosomal rearrangements was found between Agrostis and Lolium genomes. Fewer rearrangements were detected in comparisons of the two species, Lolium and Agrostis, with Triticeae than of the two species with Avena.

Technical Abstract: Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera, 2n=4x=28) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne, 2n=2x=14) are important cool season turf and forage grass species worldwide. These are self-incompatible and highly heterozygous outbreeders. Because these species are more recently domesticated through selection from naturalized populations, from intra- and inter-specific hybridizations, and through selection pressures (grazing, mowing, and forage nutrition, property, and color), they are very different from cereal crop species that have a long history of cultivation. Genomic research on these species is very important to deepen and broaden knowledge of turf and forage grass genomes. Dense genetic linkage maps in the allotetraploid and the diploid genomes were constructed for a comparative genome analysis with other Poaceae species using a common set of cereal and bentgrass cDNA RFLP probes. Comparative genome analysis via number and pattern of chromosomal rearrangements do not support morphological trait analysis based affinity relationships among Agrostis, Lolium, Triticeae, and Avena in the same subfamily Pooideae of the grass family Poaceae. No evidence of chromosomal rearrangements was found between Agrostis and Lolium genomes. Fewer rearrangements were detected in comparisons of Lolium and Agrostis with Triticeae than with Avena.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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