Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Coelomycetes

Author
item Dugan, Frank

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 22, 2005
Publication Date: July 24, 2007
Citation: Dugan, F.M. 2007. Coelomycetes. In: In: McGraw-Hill Book Company editor. McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, 10th edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. p. 363-364.

Interpretive Summary: Coelomycetes are defined as filamentous fungi that reproduce asexually by making spores inside microscopic fruiting bodies. The manner in which these fungi have been classified has changed radically over past decades. Concise descriptions are provided for traditional and modern classifications. It is stressed that the term "coelomycetes" does not reflect a classification based on evolution. Instead, the term embraces multiple evolutionary lines which have similar morphologies. The coelomycetes which have received the most attention are plant pathogens. Their fundamental biology, importance and control are briefly described, and further literature is provided for identification and for specific genera.

Technical Abstract: Coelomycetes are defined as filamentous fungi that reproduce asexually by making spores inside microscopic fruiting bodies. Taxonomy is reviewed with respect to a traditional classification (employing the orders Melanconiales, Sphaeropsidales and Pycnothyriales) and innovative classifications (employing structures of conidiogenous cells). The group is non-phylogenetic, and by convention includes members of ascomycetes and, more rarely, basidiomycetes. Most can be cultivated on artificial media and preserved by lyophilization, suspension in glycerol and freezing at very low temperature, or by desiccation followed by freezing, but extended time in culture may impair sporulation and/or pathogenicity. Biology, economic importance and control are briefly sketched with respect to anamorphic and teleomorphic states, and with reference to several important genera. Further references are provided.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page