Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Spatial/temporal Model for Survivability of Pea Leafminer (Liriomyza Huidobrensis)in Warm Climates: a Case Study in South Florida, Usa

Authors
item Milla, Katherine - FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY
item Reitz, Stuart

Submitted to: European Journal of Scientific Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 31, 2004
Publication Date: July 1, 2005
Citation: Milla, K., Reitz, S.R. 2005. Spatial/temporal model for survivability of pea leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis)in warm climates: a case study in South Florida, USA. European Journal of Scientific Research. 7:65-73.

Interpretive Summary: The highly invasive pea leafminer is a significant pest of quarantine concern to the state of Florida because of the risk that it poses to the vegetable and ornamental flower industry. Because this leafminer is indigenous to cooler, upland regions of South America, it has been speculated that climatic conditions in South Florida are inhospitable to the establishment of year-round populations. The possibility exists, however, that seasonal populations could survive and pose a risk during the cool seasons in South Florida. To assess the risk of the pea leafminer becoming established in Florida, scientists with Florida A&M University and the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology analyzed spatial and temporal climatic conditions and cropping patterns in southern Florida. Based on these analyses, conditions in south Florida during the winter are consistent with temperature requirements for development of the pea leafminer. These favorable climatic conditions, combined with the existence of a major concentration of crop and nursery lands in the vicinity of the Miami International Airport, an important entry point for potentially infested produce and cut flowers, present a risk of establishment for seasonal populations of the pea leafminer.

Technical Abstract: Due to a recently-developed resistance to broad spectrum pesticides, the highly invasive pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis, has become a polyphagous pest of vegetable and flower crops in many parts of the world, including most Latin American countries. Although L. huidobrensis is acclimated to cooler climates, the possibility exists that seasonal populations could survive and thus pose a risk during the cool seasons in warm climate regions. This paper reports on a pilot project conducted in South Florida, USA, to test the possibility that L. huidobrensis can survive during cool season months in warm climates. Temporal and spatial analysis of temperature data from South Florida indicate that climatic conditions in the region are consistent with temperature requirements for seasonal development of L. huidobrensis. Favorable climatic conditions, combined with the existence of a major concentration of crop and nursery land uses in the vicinity of the Miami International Airport, a major entry point for potentially infested produce and cut flowers, present a risk of establishment of seasonal populations of L. huidobrensis. This pilot study demonstrates that the potential exists for L. huidobrensis to establish seasonal populations in warmer climates or to survive transport to cooler regions. This potential should raise quarantine concerns even for many parts of the world where year-round populations of L. huidobrensis probably do not pose a threat.

Last Modified: 8/2/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page