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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: 'jeanne' Gooseberry

Authors
item Hummer, Kim
item Reed, Barbara

Submitted to: International Rubus Ribes Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2005
Publication Date: December 20, 2005
Citation: Hummer, K.E., Reed, B.M. 2005. 'jeanne' gooseberry [abstract]. International Rubus Ribes Symposium. Chile. p.19.

Interpretive Summary: 'Jeanne' is a late-ripening, dark red, dessert gooseberry with an unknown European background. This plant has been observed for 24 years in Corvallis, Oregon. It was donated to the USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in 1981, from a previous small fruit collection of the USDA and Oregon State University, Department of Horticulture, in Corvallis, Oregon. 'Jeanne' was named in honor of Ms. Cheryl Jeanne Gunning, who worked in the tissue culture laboratory of the NCGR from 1981 to 1985. 'Jeanne' blooms in mid- to late-April, about 1 to 2 weeks after other red gooseberries. The fruit ripen from mid- to late-July, about 1 week later than those of other gooseberries. The fruit ripen to a deep red skin color. The fruit are medium in size. The yield is higher than that of many gooseberry plants. The fruit taste is full and sweet. The plant tends to be upright growing and has some thorns. The leaves and fruits of 'Jeanne' are resistant to foliar diseases and insect pests. We recommend this cultivar for home plantings or commercial gooseberry production in the temperate climate zones. It should perform well under organic production.

Technical Abstract: Ribes uva-crispa L. 'Jeanne' is a late-ripening, dark red, dessert gooseberry with an unknown European pedigree. This genotype has been observed for 24 years in Oregon, under the selection numbers O. T. 126, CRIB 11, and PI 555830. It was donated to the USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in 1981, from the Ribes collection maintained by the USDA and Oregon State University, Department of Horticulture, in Corvallis, Oregon. Its origin prior to the Corvallis collection is undocumented. 'Jeanne' was named in honor of the late Ms. Cheryl Jeanne Gunning, who worked in the tissue culture laboratory of the NCGR from 1981 to 1985. 'Jeanne' buds break during the last week of March in Corvallis, Oregon. Full bloom occurs in mid- to late-April, about 1 to 2 weeks after blooms of R. uva-crispa 'Invicta' or 'Captivator'. The fruit ripen from mid- to late-July, about 1 week later than the fruit of 'Invicta' or 'Captivator', and are ripe for about 1 week. The fruit ripen to a deeper red than those of 'Captivator'. Fruits weigh about 5.0 g/berry (7 year average), tend to be smaller than those of 'Invicta', but larger than those of 'Captivator'. The yield is higher than many gooseberry plants. The fruit taste is full, sweet, and improved over 'Captivator'. The plant tends to be upright, growing to 1.5 m x 1.5 m, and has single nodal thorns. The leaves and fruits of 'Jeanne' are highly resistant to powdery mildew, caused by Sphaerotheca mors-uva (Schwein). Berk. & Curt. The leaves are also highly resistant to white pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola Fisher. Damage from aphids (Capitophorus ribis L.) or defoliation from sawflies (Pachynematus spp.) is less severe on 'Jeanne' than in other European gooseberries. Black leaf spot, caused by Drepanopeziza ribis (Kleb.) Hohn, is visible on some leaves in summer, but does not appear to cause plant damage. We recommend this cultivar for home plantings or commercial gooseberry production in the Pacific Northwestern United States and in other temperate climate zones. We expect that this cultivar will be good for organic production because of its pest resistance and very good fruit quality. It could extend the production season of red gooseberries beyond 'Captivator'.

Last Modified: 8/2/2014
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