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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BENEFITS AND RISKS OF USING WASTE FOUNDRY SAND FOR AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL APPLICATIONS Title: Mid-Infrared Analysis of Foundry Green Sands and Chemically Bonded Cores

Authors
item Dungan, Robert
item Reeves Iii, James

Submitted to: Journal of Residuals Science & Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 27, 2005
Publication Date: January 1, 2006
Citation: Dungan, R.S., Reeves III, J.B. 2006. Mid-infrared analysis of foundry green sands and chemically bonded cores. Journal of Residuals Science & Technology. 3(1):61-66.

Interpretive Summary: Each year the U.S. foundry industry landfills several million tons of molding sand known as green sand. Currently, there is great interest in beneficially using these waste green sands in geotechnical and agricultural applications. However, there is concern of organic contamination from chemically bonded cores and carbonaceous additives used in the green sand molds. For this study, green sands and cores were collected from iron and aluminum foundries. The objective was to determine if mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy could be qualitatively used to identify bands associated with organic residues in the green sands. Bands unique to the core resins and carbonaceous additives were identified in both iron and aluminum green sands. When compared, aluminum green sands appeared to have higher levels of organics, which may be a result of the lower pouring temperature of aluminum. Ultimately, it may be possible to use MIR spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the level of residual and potentially harmful organics in waste green sands.

Technical Abstract: Each year the U.S. foundry industry landfills several million tons of molding sand known as green sand. Currently, there is great interest in using these waste green sands in general construction and agricultural applications. However, there is concern of organic contamination from the green sands. The objective was to determine if infrared spectroscopy could be qualitatively used to identify organic residues in the green sands. In both iron and aluminum green sands, the unique signature of organic residues were identified and aluminum green sands appeared to have higher levels of organics. Ultimately, it may be possible to use infrared spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the level of residual and potentially harmful organics in waste green sands. The ability to rapidly identify and quantify harmful organics would ensure that foundry sands are safe for use in the environment.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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