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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Patterns of Molecular and Quantitative Trait Variation in Malus Sieversii from Kazakhstan

Authors
item Richards, Christopher
item Henk, Adam
item Reilley, Ann
item Forsline, Philip
item Volk, Gayle

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 4, 2005
Publication Date: January 13, 2006
Citation: Richards, C.M., Henk, A.D., Reilley, A., Forsline, P.L., Volk, G.M. 2006. Patterns of molecular and quantitative trait variation in Malus sieversii from kazakhstan. Meeting Proceedings of the Plant and Animal Genome XIV, January 13-18, 2006, San Diego, CA.

Interpretive Summary: Kazakhstan is a center of origin for Malus sieversii (Lebed.), one of the main progenitors of the domesticated apple (Malus x domestica). Mature seedlings resulting from seeds collected from 12 sampling sites within Kazakhstan have been planted and evaluated at the USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit in Geneva, NY. Data collected from seven unlinked microsatellite loci and 21 quantitative traits (including tree, fruit, and disease resistance characters) have been used to describe the diversity and differentiation of 1013 M. sieversii individuals. The resulting data are analyzed to estimate population structure and their environmental and geographic correlates. We propose a core subset of this diversity that is amenable to studies directed towards allele mining and comparative genomics. This project was supported by the National Research Initiative of the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, grant number #2005-35300-15466.

Technical Abstract: Kazakhstan is a center of origin for Malus sieversii (Lebed.), one of the main progenitors of the domesticated apple (Malus x domestica). Mature seedlings resulting from seeds collected from 12 sampling sites within Kazakhstan have been planted and evaluated at the USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit in Geneva, NY. Data collected from seven unlinked microsatellite loci and 21 quantitative traits (including tree, fruit, and disease resistance characters) have been used to describe the diversity and differentiation of 1013 M. sieversii individuals. The resulting data are analyzed to estimate population structure and their environmental and geographic correlates. We propose a core subset of this diversity that is amenable to studies directed towards allele mining and comparative genomics. This project was supported by the National Research Initiative of the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, grant number #2005-35300-15466.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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