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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Epidemiologic Applications of Emerging Infectious Disease Modeling to Support Us Military Readiness and National Security

Authors
item Chretien, Jean-Paul - DOD-GEIS
item Linthicum, Kenneth
item Pavlin, Julie - UNIFORMED SER UNIV HLT SC
item Gaydos, Joel - DOD-GEIS
item Malone, Joseph - DOD-GEIS

Submitted to: Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 19, 2005
Publication Date: January 15, 2006
Repository URL: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol12no01/05-1214.htm
Citation: Chretien, J., Linthicum, K., Pavlin, J.A., Gaydos, J.C., Malone, J.L. 2006. Epidemiologic applications of emerging infectious disease modeling to support us military readiness and national security. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 12(1):05-1214.

Interpretive Summary: Advances in models to predict emerging infectious disease will greatly assist in detection and control of these diseases. The Department of Defense (DoD) uses epidemiologic modeling to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases that threaten US military personnel, their families, or national security. The DoD applications include collaborations with other federal agencies, national laboratories, and universities. On August 3, 2005, the DoD-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System hosted a symposium to develop plans and recommendations for current and future applications of disease modeling in the DoD, including collaborations with non-military organizations. The symposium entitled “Emerging Infectious Disease Modeling: Epidemiologic Applications in the DoD” included 45 participants representing 20 DoD and non-DoD organizations. Brief presentations and facilitated discussion focused on three areas where the DoD currently employs EID modeling systems (comprised of software and statistical methods): satellite-based measurements of environmental characteristics to predict disease habitats or disease transmission dynamics (“Remote Sensing” area), syndromic surveillance systems to rapidly detect natural disease outbreaks or bioterrorism (“Syndromic Surveillance”), and simulation of natural outbreaks or bioterrorism to evaluate response preparedness (“Epidemiologic Simulation”).

Technical Abstract: Advances in epidemiologic modeling offer new opportunities for emerging infectious disease (EID) prediction, detection, and control. Recent applications across diverse fields include simulations of pandemic influenza to evaluate containment strategies, ecological niche modeling to identify potential reservoirs for Ebola and Marburg viruses, and development of statistical algorithms for detecting natural outbreaks and bioterrorism in syndromic surveillance systems. The Department of Defense (DoD) uses epidemiologic modeling to detect and respond to EIDs that threaten US military personnel, their families, or national security. DoD applications include collaborations with other federal agencies, national laboratories, and universities. On August 3, 2005, the DoD-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS) hosted a symposium to develop plans and recommendations for current and future applications of EID modeling in the DoD, including collaborations with non-military organizations. The symposium entitled “Emerging Infectious Disease Modeling: Epidemiologic Applications in the DoD” included 45 participants representing 20 DoD and non-DoD organizations. Brief presentations and facilitated discussion focused on three areas where the DoD currently employs EID modeling systems (comprised of software and statistical methods): satellite-based measurements of environmental characteristics to predict pathogen niches or disease transmission dynamics (“Remote Sensing” area), syndromic surveillance systems to rapidly detect natural disease outbreaks or bioterrorism (“Syndromic Surveillance”), and simulation of natural outbreaks or bioterrorism to evaluate response preparedness (“Epidemiologic Simulation”).

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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