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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Winter Feeding Sites of Hay in Round Bales As Major Developmental Sites of Stable Flies, Stomoxys Calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae), in Pastures in Spring and Summer

Authors
item Broce, Alberto - KANSAS ST UNIV, MANHATTAN
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Paisley, Steven - KANSAS ST UNIV, MANHATTAN

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 7, 2005
Publication Date: December 1, 2005
Citation: Broce, A.B., Hogsette Jr, J.A., Paisley, S. 2005. Winter feeding sites of hay in round bales as major developmental sites of stable flies, stomoxys calcitrans (diptera: muscidae), in pastures in spring and summer. Journal of Economic Entomology. 98(6):2307-2312.

Interpretive Summary: Stable flies have been recognized historically as the most significant pest of livestock in feedlot operations. However in the last two decades in the Midwestern states, they have become major pests of pastured cattle and horses as well. To better understand the cause of this problem, scientists at the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL, worked with scientists at Kansas State University, Department of Entomology, Manhattan, KS, to determine the role of suspected habitats, namely residues from rolled hay bales fed during the winter months. Traps placed in the vicinity of hay feeding sites caught more stable flies than those placed distant from these sites. Stable flies emerging from the same hay feeding sites ranged from 102 to 1225 flies per core sample. Overall results support the hypothesis that winter feeding sites of hay in round bales are the main source of stable flies in pastures.

Technical Abstract: Stable flies, long recognized historically as the most significant pest of livestock in feedlot operations, have more recently in the Midwestern states become major pests of pastured cattle and horses as well. To better understand the cause of this problem, studies were conducted in the spring, summer and fall months in Kansas to determine the role of suspected habitats, namely residues from the large round hay bales fed during the winter months. Sticky traps placed in the vicinity of winter hay feeding sites caught more stable flies than those placed distant from these sites. Stable fly adults that emerged from the same hay feeding sites ranged from 102 to 1225 flies per core sample. Overall results support the hypothesis that winter feeding sites of hay in round bales are the main source of stable flies in pastures.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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