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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Gulfking and Gulfcrest, New Peaches for the Lower Coastal Plain

Authors
item Krewer, G - UGA, TIFTON, GA
item Beckman, Thomas
item Chaparro, J - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Sherman, W - UNIV OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 5, 2005
Publication Date: June 1, 2005
Citation: Krewer, G., Beckman, T.G., Chaparro, J., Sherman, W. 2005. Gulfking and Gulfcrest, new peaches for the lower coastal plain. Hortscience. 40(3):882.

Interpretive Summary: Gulfking and Gulfcrest peaches are jointly released for grower trials by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Trees of Gulfking and Gulfcrest produce an attractive, sweet-tasting, yellow and non-melting flesh fruit intended for the fresh fruit market. They are expected to produce fruit with tree-ripened aroma and taste while retaining firmness for longer shelf life than fruit from conventional melting-flesh cultivars. Trees of Gulfking reach full bloom most seasons in mid-February in lower south Georgia and are estimated to require 350 chill units. We expect this new peach to be adapted in areas where Flordaking has been successfully grown. Fruit ripen 73-80 days from full bloom, typically in early May, usually with Flordaking in southern Georgia. The fruit are large, ranging from 105 to 130 grams. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 80-90 percent red (with moderately fine darker red stripes) over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with recessed tip. Pits are medium small and have little tendency to split even when crop loads are low. Trees of Gulfcrest are estimated to require 525 chill units. This is based on full bloom consistently occurring with Sunfre nectarine at Attapulgus, Georgia, where full bloom occurs most seasons in early-March. Fruit ripen 62-75 days from full bloom, typically in early to mid-May, usually a few days after Flordacrest in southern Georgia. The fruit are medium-large, averaging about 105 grams. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 90-95 percent red over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with recessed tip. Pits are medium small and have little tendency to split even when crop loads are low.

Technical Abstract: Gulfking and Gulfcrest peaches are jointly released for grower trials by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Trees of Gulfking and Gulfcrest produce an attractive, sweet-tasting, yellow and non-melting flesh fruit intended for the fresh fruit market. They are expected to produce fruit with tree-ripened aroma and taste while retaining firmness for longer shelf life than fruit from conventional melting-flesh cultivars. Trees of Gulfking reach full bloom most seasons in mid-February in lower south Georgia and are estimated to require 350 chill units. We expect this new peach to be adapted in areas where Flordaking has been successfully grown. Fruit ripen 73-80 days from full bloom, typically in early May, usually with Flordaking in southern Georgia. The fruit are large, ranging from 105 to 130 grams. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 80-90 percent red (with moderately fine darker red stripes) over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with recessed tip. Pits are medium small and have little tendency to split even when crop loads are low. Trees of Gulfcrest are estimated to require 525 chill units. This is based on full bloom consistently occurring with Sunfre nectarine at Attapulgus, Georgia, where full bloom occurs most seasons in early-March. Fruit ripen 62-75 days from full bloom, typically in early to mid-May, usually a few days after Flordacrest in southern Georgia. The fruit are medium-large, averaging about 105 grams. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 90-95 percent red over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with recessed tip. Pits are medium small and have little tendency to split even when crop loads are low.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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